rehabilitation

(redirected from Pulmonary Rehabilitation)
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rehabilitation:

see physical therapyphysical therapy
or physiotherapy,
treatment of disorders of the muscles, bones, or joints by means of physical agents—heat, light, water, manual and electronic massage, and exercise. Stroke, arthritis, fractures, and nerve damage are common conditions treated.
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Rehabilitation

Slum areas and substandard buildings brought up to an acceptable living standard. The U.S. Department of the Interior’s standards state: “returning a property to a state of utility through repair or alteration which makes possible an efficient contemporary use while preserving those portions or features of the property which are significant to its historical architectural, and cultural values.”To repair an existing building to good condition with minimal changes to the building fabric; may also include adaptive reuse or restoration; also called rehab.

Rehabilitation

 

(1) Restoration of rights.

(2) In medicine, medical, pedagogical, occupational, and legal measures that aim to restore the health and work capacity of individuals with physical and mental limitations resulting from disease or injury. Persons undergoing rehabilitation include those suffering from some diseases of the internal organs, from congenital and acquired diseases of the musculoskeletal system, from the sequelae of severe injuries, and from mental diseases. Rehabilitation is of particular importance for children suffering from mental retardation or from defects in hearing, speech, or vision.

Rehabilitation includes such therapeutic measures as occupational and exercise therapy, sports, electrotherapy, mud therapy, and massage. These procedures are carried out in rehabilitation departments and centers in large hospitals and in institutes of traumatology, psychiatry, and cardiology. Other rehabilitative measures develop basic skills needed by patients for self-sufficiency (social and everyday rehabilitation) and train them for work (occupational and industrial rehabilitation).

rehabilitation

[‚rē·ə‚bil·ə′tā·shən]
(medicine)
The restoration to a disabled individual of maximum independence commensurate with his limitations by developing his residual capacity.

rehabilitation

The process of returning a building to its original state of utility by means of repair or alteration.
References in periodicals archive ?
As part of the survey development, 3 expert pulmonary rehabilitation physiotherapists reviewed the questions.
Another study involving 119 patients showed that completion of pulmonary rehabilitation significantly improved patients' quality of life scores (Figure 3) (11).
Although the contents of pulmonary rehabilitation programs vary from site to site, most rehabilitation programs teach patients about the disease, and provide structured exercise training consisting of both aerobic and strength exercises (e.
Exercise during pulmonary rehabilitation benefits patients with COPD by inducing physiologic adaptations that reduce demand on the respiratory system at rest.
Abstract: Research utilizing the Transtheoretical Model (TM) and social support within clinical exercise populations is lacking and this study assessed those constructs among cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation program participants.
There is also growing evidence that good nutrition and exercise within a pulmonary rehabilitation programme can improve the quality of life of people with chronic lung disease and reduce life-threatening attacks ``However, the most important way to actually stop lung damage occurring in the first place is to give up smoking.
Across the UK, where you live now determines the likelihood of having access to proven treatments such as pulmonary rehabilitation.
Dr John Harvey, of the British Thoracic Society, said: "Further research is needed, especially on those with chronic lung disease, since diet plays an important part in pulmonary rehabilitation and can help people to have a better quality of life.
Later, I started a comprehensive, ambulatory pulmonary rehabilitation clinic to aid tobacco afflicted bronchitis and emphysema sufferers, who were often too winded to slowly climb one flight of stairs.
Several of our subacute-oriented facilities are moving toward establishing therapist teams combining PT, OT, speech therapy and respiratory therapy, and focusing on pulmonary rehabilitation, such as ventilator weaning.