pulmonary embolism

(redirected from Pulmonary emboli)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

pulmonary embolism

[‚pu̇l·mə‚ner·ē ′em·bə‚liz·əm]
(medicine)
Obstruction of the pulmonary artery or a branch of it by a free-floating blood clot (embolus) usually originating from a vein in the leg or pelvic area.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, patients who were obese or immobile were more likely to have pulmonary emboli.
When it occurs, it is usually secondary to volume overload due to severe, organic TR or to pressure overload due to pulmonary hypertension caused by septic pulmonary emboli (or both).
2,15) Septic pulmonary emboli are usually associated with right-sided endocarditis or deep vein thrombosis/thrombophlebitis.
The minor criteria comprised of multiple positive blood cultures, evidence of septic pulmonary emboli, absence of systemic emboli, and a murmur compatible with tricuspid involvement.
Decreased mobility also predisposes to urinary tract infections, deep vein thromboses and pulmonary emboli.
A ventilation/perfusion scan demonstrated bilateral lower lobe pulmonary emboli and a CTPA showed an acute massive pulmonary embolus at the first order branches of the left pulmonary artery (Figure 1), with smaller embolus at the first order branch of the right pulmonary artery.
The team of doctors responsible for his care initially listed pulmonary emboli as a possible cause of Mr Lowden's symptoms.
The incidence of pulmonary emboli in the general population is approximately 1 per 1000, with a mortality rate of 15% in the first three months following diagnosis (Heit, 2008).
Two other patients had septic pulmonary emboli suggested by computed tomographic scan.
Pulmonary emboli were seen in CT scans on five of the 14 ICU patients.
One can also exclude PDA-associated complications on MDCT such as cardiomegaly (LV and LA involvement), pulmonary hypertension (pulmonary artery >3 cm), Eisenmenger's syndrome (shunt reversal, enlarged RV RA), pulmonary oedema, pulmonary infection, pulmonary emboli, and the effects of infective endocarditis.
Autopsies were performed on two patients; results in both patients confirmed bilateral severe hemorrhagic viral pneumonitis with interstitial inflammation and diffuse alveolar damage and concurrent bilateral pulmonary emboli.

Full browser ?