pulmonary circulation

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pulmonary circulation

[′pu̇l·mə‚ner·ē ‚sər·kyə′lā·shən]
(physiology)
The circulation of blood through the lungs for the purpose of oxygenation and the release of carbon dioxide. Also known as lesser circulation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The decreased transmural pressure increases the intraluminal pressure, which "pushes" the blood from pulmonary vessels into the left ventricle and increases left ventricular preload.
In addition, studies have shown a 50% reduction in prostacyclin synthase activity in the small pulmonary vessels of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.
The effects by the water-soluble fraction would be more biologically relevant because components in this fraction are more likely than the whole particles or the insoluble fraction to gain access to the pulmonary vessels quickly by diffusion after the particles are inhaled into the lung.
In this condition, embolic tumor cells obstruct pulmonary vessels, activate the coagulation cascade (24), and produce inflammatory mediators promoting thrombosis and intimal proliferation (23).
Infants with cardiac shunt lesions develop pulmonary oedema due to the increased hydrostatic pressure in the engorged pulmonary vessels.
NO is exceptionally selective as it vasodilators areas of the pulmonary vessels that are ventilated to the greatest degree.
Pulmonary vessels are of uniform calibre throughout the lung.
To date its application within the pulmonary vessels has been predominantly described in the treatment of arteriovenous malformations (5).
In old times, the "angiogram sign," in which branching pulmonary vessels could be visualized normally within areas of consolidation on contrast-enhanced CT, was reported as a specific sign of the pneumonic type of bronchoalveolar cell carcinoma, (70) however, it also can be seen in pneumonia.
7) In a study by Rowley et al, (8) high numbers of IgA plasma cells were found in pulmonary vessels, the trachea, and peribronchial tissue.
4] was primarily due to constriction of upstream pulmonary vessels (Figure 1B).
In contrast to pulmonary arterial hypertension, all of the pulmonary vessels are enlarged in pulmonary overcirculation.