Pumping


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pumping

[′pəmp·iŋ]
(fluid mechanics)
Unsteadiness of the mercury in the barometer, caused by fluctuations of the air pressure produced by a gusty wind or due to the motion of a vessel.
(physics)
The application of optical, infrared, or microwave radiation of appropriate frequency to a laser or maser medium so that absorption of the radiation increases the population of atoms or molecules in higher energy states. Also known as electronic pumping.
The removal of gases and vapors from a vacuum system.

Pumping

 

(in quantum electronics), the process of creation of a nonequilibrium state of a substance under the action of electromagnetic fields or collisions with charged or neutral particles, upon abrupt cooling of preheated gaseous masses, and so on. Pumping may shift a substance from a state of thermal equilibrium to an active state (with a population inversion), in which it can amplify and generate electromagnetic waves.

The term “pumping” has spread beyond the bounds of quantum electronics—it is used in radio engineering and optics to designate the processes by which the active elements of parametric systems are affected.

pumping

The displacement and ejection of water and suspended fine particles at joints, cracks, and edges.
References in periodicals archive ?
Usually, the loss in pumping action is a symptom of an underlying heart problem, such as coronary artery disease.
Many have found that relying on previously tried-and-tested pumping technologies may not be enough anymore and have begun to look for alternatives.
It is essential that process and maintenance engineers review the pumping system design in the event of a process change to ensure that it remains suitable under the new operating conditions.
They also are used for multi-channel pumping (i.e., using one pump and a variety of tubes to transfer many different fluids simultaneously).
All of these pumps have very high pumping speeds for water vapor, but they have, relative to water vapor, limited speeds and capacities for light gases such as helium and hydrogen.
Dry installed, clean-water pumps continue to dominate for use in main pumping stations.
Throughout the lifetime of a pumping system, it is unlikely that the same operating conditions will continue to prevail.
Heater sizes from 6 kw and up, pumping capacities from l0 gpm and up, and single- and dual-zone configurations.
If the secondary line is properly designed in terms of length and diameter, the full pumping speed of the roughing pump can be achieved.
Thouless of the University of Washington in Seattle formulated theories in the 1980s and early 1990s that indicated the feasibility of such quantum pumping.
If smaller quantities are to be pumped, the pumping must be intermittent.