Punalua


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Punalua

 

a late form of group marriage that was observed in the 19th century among Hawaiians; in a punaluan family, several sisters or more distant female relations were married to several men, who became their common husbands. L. H. Morgan erroneously believed that the punaluan family was a universal form, following the consanguineal family, in the development of the family in the prehistoric era. In The Origin of the Family, Private Property, and the State (4th ed., 1891), F. Engels noted that Morgan incorrectly ascribed universality to the punaluan family (see K. Marx and F. Engels, Sock, 2nd ed., vol. 21, p. 47). Engels was proven correct in subsequent research.

References in periodicals archive ?
In these platonic romances mentioned earlier, the sexual mate and the platonic mate of the loved one were punalua to each other (see below).
Punalua was the word for the relationship of two (or more) people who shared a mate openly and agreeably.
In modern times, women married to brothers or cousins, or men married to sisters or cousins might also be referred to as punalua (Pukui and Handy, 1998).