Punnett Square


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Punnett Square

 

a graphic method proposed by the British geneticist R. Punnett for visually representing the combination of different types of sexual cells, or gametes, during crossbreeding. Female gametes are arranged along one side of the square, and male gametes along an adjacent side. The genotypes formed from the combination of the gametes are inscribed within the grid. The use of the Punnett square facilitates the calculation of the possible combinations of different types of gametes.

References in periodicals archive ?
If you look at the Punnett Square on page 14, you'll note the genotype in the lower right box should be "bbee," not "Bbee," as shown.
Using Table 1, they proceed to build a Punnett square to show genotypic outcomes.
Khan Academy currently offers several lessons on genetics that are typically seen in high school or first-year college curriculums, including: An introduction to DNA, Introduction to Heredity, the Hardy-Weinberg Principle, and Punnett Square Fun.
A chart called a Punnett square can help you determine the odds that offspring will express a certain trait.
To see how this can happen, we'll have to reach into our middle school science books and pull out the Punnett Square.
The inheritance calculator uses a Punnett square tool to work out patterns of a recessive inheritance trait based on peaked or straight hairlines.
Use a Punnett square to tell what percent of the kittens will be Munchkins.
The students were instructed to find the genotypes of the parents and child, using a Punnett square to demonstrate how their answers were determined.
A chart called a Punnett square helps determine the types of traits an offspring can inherit.
There are a few minor details that could have clarified certain ideas for laymen, such as a traditional Punnett square to help illustrate crosses more clearly, simplified definitions (a phenotype is defined here as "a manifestation of a genotype," which isn't a very clear definition for the layman), and a better explanation of dominance/recessiveness, for example.
I first ask: "Based on a Punnett Square, what are the odds that a carrier of a new mutation will leave carrier descendants?
in Springfield; participants will learn about traits and heredity and use Punnett squares and monster-parent-genotypes to design their own monster babies; free; recommended for ages 8 to 14.