pupillary reflex

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Related to Pupillary light reflex: accommodation reflex

pupillary reflex

[′pyü·pə‚ler·ē ′rē‚fleks]
(physiology)
Contraction of the pupil in response to stimulation of the retina by light. Also known as Whytt's reflex.
Contraction of the pupil on accommodation for close vision, and dilation of the pupil on accommodation for distant vision.
Contraction of the pupil on attempted closure of the eye. Also known as Westphal-Pilcz reflex; Westphal's pupillary reflex.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yin, "Transient pupillary light reflex in relation to fundus autofluorescence and dark-adapted perimetry in typical retinitis pigmentosa," Ophthalmic Research, vol.
Changes in the sympathetic or parasympathetic tone (neuronal activity) are brought up by changes via reflex mechanism (as in pupillary light reflex), emotional changes affecting the limbic system and the diencephalon specifically the hypothalamus, and the modulation of the neuronal activity in the midbrain specifically pretectal region and the Edinger-Westphal nucleus (accessory oculomotor nucleus).
Pupillary light reflex as an objective biomarker for early identification of blast-induced mTBI.
The pupillary light reflex measurement was performed on both eyes, which were subjected to a series of 5 flashes at 30-s intervals.
It was impossible to have cooperation with the patient due to the mixed aphasia and her pupils were anisocoric (right > left), and pupillary light reflex can be taken.
Apart from TCCD, the development of multipurpose ultrasound systems has facilitated the assessment of optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) as a surrogate measure of ICP and recently the recording of pupillary light reflex (PLR) when visual access to the pupil is impeded [4-10].
Oval pupil in patients with diabetes mellitus: examination by measurement of the dark-adapted pupillary area and pupillary light reflex. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, 29 (1), 43-48.
Visual acuity was found to be 6/60; there was loss of temporal field of vision, with sluggish pupillary light reflex, and normal extraocular muscles along with slight papilloedema.
This is similar to the study of NIMHANS 14 in which 98.40% (40) of the patients with absent pupillary light reflex were found to have a poor outcome.
The pupillary light reflex and accommodation reflex are non-voluntary and therefore important identifiers of non-organic pathology.
We have also found a significant prolongation of the recovery time of the pupillary light reflex response in the group of old subjects.
The study demonstrates a mean reduction in pupillary light reflex in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension suggesting that pupillometry reading can be indicative of changes in ICP.