Purism


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purism

insistence on traditional canons of correctness of form or purity of style or content, esp in language, art, or music

Purism

 

a movement in French painting in the second and third decades of the 20th century. The founders and chief proponents of purism were A. Ozenfant and C. E. Jeanneret (Le Corbusier). The purists protested against what they considered to be the merely decorative tendencies of cubism, which was marked by deliberate distortion. They sought to clearly render “stable” objective forms and to represent “primary” elements, which could be apprehended with minimum effort. Purist works were marked by emphatic two-dimensionality and the flowing rhythm of semitransparent silhouettes and outlines of objects (intentionally of one type—carafes, tumblers, and similar items). Purism failed to develop in painting, but, after undergoing a substantial number of theoretical revisions, found application in modern architecture, particularly in the designs of Le Corbusier.

REFERENCES

Modernizm (collection of articles). Moscow, 1973.
Jeanneret, C. E., and A. Ozenfant. Après le cubisme. Paris, 1918.

Purism

 

efforts to purify a literary language of foreign borrowings and neologisms and to prevent its penetration by non-normative lexical and grammatical elements, including colloquialisms, popular speech, and dialectisms.

Purism is characteristic of a period in which the norms of a national literary language are becoming established and its stylistic system is changing. Such periods, marked by an influx of new lexical elements and their stylistic redistribution, are generally associated with political and cultural movements; this has been the case in Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Turkey, India, and elsewhere. Purists have sometimes insisted that if a national language is to be distinctive, it must be completely purged of even essential borrowings: that is, words of foreign origin already part of the language must be replaced by native words or by neologisms composed from native morphemes.

In Russian democratic literary criticism of the 19th century, represented by such writers as V. G. Belinskii, the term “purism” denoted a formal, conservative attitude toward language; the chief proponents of this view were A. S. Shishkov, F. V. Bul-garin, N. I. Grech, and M. P. Pogodin.

REFERENCES

Vinokur, G. O. “O purizme.” In his book O kul’ture iazyka, 2nd ed.
Moscow, 1929. Vinokur, G. O. Russkii iazyk. Moscow, 1945.

T. V. VENTTSEL

References in periodicals archive ?
The argument that we can indigenise and deracialise English is not far-fetched, but its efficacy is doubtful with any attempts at purism.
The paranoid position exhibited by the enormous variety of religious and nationalistic fundamentalisms that now plague 21st-century Globopolis offers the delusion of inclusion when, really, such purism is exclusive.
One has the impression that his sudden conversion to modernist aesthetics did not allow him time to digest the wide range of references that composed the lexicon of Purism and other aesthetic movements in Europe.
18) On the role of language purism in this process, see the first general chapter in Swain 1996.
Of course, such a theory has tremendous pull for many political positions, including all kinds of racism and ethnic and cultural purism.
Having chosen coalition with the Conservatives over the purism of opposition (and it is fair to say that some activists are unhappy with the notion of being in power per se), the Liberal Democrats nonetheless have a thorny strategic problem.
In continental Europe, the governments that opted for purism had to correct the resulting ineffectiveness and adopt what is known as "rationalized parliamentary government" to increase the means of action available to the government.
In Vancouver during the 1970s, for example, a group of counterculturally-inclined youth who were turned off by the purism they saw at work in the Vancouver Folk Song Society decided to establish their own club, the Pacific Bluegrass and Heritage Society, which has been the centre of a thriving bluegrass and oldtime music scene in that city for over thirty years.
The author has not been captured by an academic temptation to sacrifice development utility to theoretical purism.
37) For an illuminating discussion of this issue, see David Martyn, "Borrowed Fatherland: Nationalism and Language Purism in Fichte's Addresses to the German Nation," The Germanic Review 72, no.
But for Koenig, who studied the semiotics of post-colonial literature, concepts like purism and authenticity are as outdated as a land line.