echinacea

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echinacea

(ĕk'ənā`shēə), popular herbal remedy, or botanical, believed to benefit the immune system. It is used especially to alleviate common colds and the flu. Several controlled studies using it as a cold medicine have failed to find any benefit from its use, but a 2007 review of 14 different studies said that echinacea could have modest to marked effects against cold viruses. Echinacea is extracted from the roots and flowering tops of the purple coneflowerconeflower,
name for several American wildflowers of the family Asteraceae (aster family). The purple coneflowers (genus Echinacea), found E of the Rockies, have purple to pinkish petallike rays; some cultivated forms have white flowers.
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 (Echinacea angustifolia and E. purpurea).
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echinacea

echinacea

The famous immune system stimulant that’s touted as a healing wonder, used for everything from herpes to brown recluse spider bites. Great for colds, flu and anything your body may be fighting. Increases levels of virus-fighting interferon in the body. Prompts the thymus, bone marrow, and spleen to produce more immune cells. Helps cleanse the blood and boost lymph system cleansing making it a powerful detoxifier for removing infection organisms. Used on hard-to-heal wounds, even sun-damaged skin. Cortisone-like activity. Increases levels of virus-fighting interferon in the body. Not recommended for people with HIV or AIDS. The flower has a brown spiky seed ball with long thin pinkish purple petals around it. The whole plant is edible. Most of the power is in the root, but you can use the flower and seeds by crushing and drying them and making tea. Fresh flower petals make salads and desserts look beautiful. The seeds can be ground into a powder and used as a black pepper type spice. The seeds can also be sprouted and eaten as echinacea sprouts.(good winter food)

Echinacea

 

(purple coneflower), a genus of perennial herbaceous plants of the family Compositae. The stems reach 1–1.5 m in height, and the inflorescences are large heads. The ray flowers are purple, crimson, or, less commonly, whitish; the disk flowers are blackish purple. There are about five species, distributed in North America. The plants have bactericidal properties and are ornamentals. E. purpurea and E. angustifolia are cultivated. Sometimes the Echinacea are included in the genus Rudbeckia.

Echinacea

[‚ek·ə′nā·shə]
(invertebrate zoology)
A suborder of echinoderms in the order Euechinoidea; individuals have a rigid test, keeled teeth, and branchial slits.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pale purple coneflower (0.05<p<0.1) showed a slight decrease in germination at the highest levels of application (Fig.
The beneficial effect of purple coneflower extract is reportedly due to its immunostimulatory activity (Rehman et al., 1999; Barrett et al., 1999; Melchart et al., 1998; Brinkeborn et al., 1998; Alschuler et al., 1997).
Significant progress has been made in conserving and restoring some of the region's rarest species, including the Tennessee purple coneflower (Echinacea tennessensis), the Okaloosa darter (Etheostoma okaloosae), the Tulotoma snail (Tulotoma magnifica), and the Alabama lampmussel (Lampsilis virescens) .
Echinacea, a wild flower (also known as the purple coneflower), is sold in capsule form in drug and retail stores.
Bees buzz among bright red blossoms of Monarda, and sturdy stems of Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) contrast with ferny foliage and fine flowers of Yarrow (Achillea species) and velvety leaves and trumpet-shaped flowers of Datura.
John's wort), prunella (self-heal) and several types of echinacea (for example, purple coneflower) for their anti-viral and anti-inflammatory properties.
In addition to at least two species of milkweed (the only host plant monarch larvae eat), a Waystation should include four or more nectar-producing flowers that bloom at different times, such as purple coneflower, goldenrod and floss flower.
In March of 2004, the Medicinal Herbs for Commerce project selected seventeen farmers across the state to receive technical assistance, seed, and a small grant to produce at least one acre of California poppy (Eschscholzia californica), dandelion (Taraxacum officinale), purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea), or valerian (Valeriana officinalis).
In Missouri, some glades do resemble prairies, with plants that include big and little bluestem, Indian grass, Indian paintbrush, prairie larkspur, purple coneflower, and blazing stars.
The purple coneflower is another wildflower that has become the workhorse of urban perennial beds.
As a border element, it is striking when planted with contrasting colors and textures such as purple coneflower, globe thistle, or Miscanthus grass.