Putrescent Infection

Putrescent Infection

 

a serious infectious complication of wounds, manifested by necrosis and putrescent decay of tissues. The causative agents of putrescent infection are microorganisms that cause putrefaction, including B. sporogenes, B. putrificus, B. pyocyaneus, Escherichia coli, and anaerobes. Coccal infection may occur with putrescent infection (mixed purulent-putrescent infection). The disease most often develops after grave trauma or when there is disturbance of the general condition of the body (exhaustion, vitamin deficiency, or dystrophy). Putrescent infection may be a complication of prolonged suppuration of a wound, or it may occur when there is thrombosis in the area of the wound. A slowly progressive necrosis of the tissues sets in. Decaying tissues are converted to a dark brown, foul-smelling mass, and often there is formation of gases. As it progresses, the process affects muscles and bones and causes a generalized, serious intoxication of the body. Treatment involves surgical operation (dissection of tissues around the wound and excision of necrotic parts as much as possible). Intensive supportive treatment (for example, blood transfusion) and antibacterial treatment (antibiotics) are necessary.

A. M. ROZENTSVEG-MARSHAK

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