Pynchon


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Pynchon

Thomas. born 1937, US novelist, author of V (1963), The Crying of Lot 49 (1967), Gravity's Rainbow (1973), and Mason and Dixon (1997)
References in periodicals archive ?
It is one thing to suggest that Pynchon, Don DeLillo, and the "New White Guys" that followed in their footsteps have leveraged a critique of other media as a way to appropriate the powers of the margin and thereby preserve their particular alcove within the art novel niche.
Given Pynchon's centrality to the postmodern canon and the multitude of narrative devices at play in his encyclopedic work, the notorious sexual "deviance" in Gravity's Rainbow makes an interesting test case for analyzing sexuality's structural role within postmodernist novels.
Pynchon suggests that, in this age of postmodernity, a sentimental lens
Eve then moves on to discuss a number of novels by Thomas Pynchon in order to trace the shift towards taxonomographic metafiction and its critical and ethical function, insightfully concluding that taxonomographic metafictions target our own reading practices.
James Gourley's book, Terrorism and Temporality in the Works of Thomas Pynchon and Don DeLillo, published in 2013, aims at showing how both Pynchon's and DeLillo's conceptualization of time changed after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 and how both reflect that devastating event in their novels through different means.
Anderson's movie, like Pynchon's novel, is specifically set in early 1970, the Season of the Witch (and of the movie Patton), the year of the Cambodian Invasion and the Manson trial, which marked the moment the war truly came home.
Through what he appealingly calls the "literature of ideas"--a blend of intellectual and literary history, literary criticism, and philosophy--LeMahieu shows how this arid and abstruse philosophy manages to persist in the fiction of Flannery O'Connor, Saul Bellow, John Barth, Don DeLillo, and Thomas Pynchon. The book is organized around the claim that logical positivism "appears tactically in postwar literature in order to advance authors' aesthetic strategies, which are often latent, implicit, or ironic" (5).
Pynchon's California: The New American Canon offers a fine work of literary criticism in an essay collection that groups Pynchon's three shortest novels together and considers them as a trilogy with common themes and insights specific to California's locales and culture.
The location, just south of the intersection of Snow Road, was in 1669 home to the John Pynchon grist mill, a site that last year was secured by the East Quabbin Land Trust of Hardwick as a preservation area.
The publication of "The Oedipus Myth and Reader Response in Pynchon's The Crying of Lot 49" in Papers on Language and Literature in 1987 was a pivotal accomplishment in my career.
The latter part of his life was a radical withdrawal into himself, going far beyond the mere aversion to publicity that also made a kind of mystery man out of Thomas Pynchon. Pynchon at least continued to publish books, which meant that he had contact with publishers and agents.
When this extraordinary novel appeared in Australia last April, one reviewer grouped it with "postmodernist maximalist opuses such as Infinite Jest, The Recognitions, 2666, A Naked Singularity and Gravity's Rainbow." The Pynchon reference is probably the most relevant: The novel takes place during the same World War II period, veers from documentary realism to outlandish fantasy, and indicts industrialists as the real warmongers, putting profits over patriotism.