Pynchon, John

Pynchon, John

(pĭn`chən), c.1626–1703, American colonist and merchant, b. England; son of William Pynchon. He emigrated to Massachusetts Bay colony with his father in 1630. When his father returned to England in 1652, young Pynchon acquired a profitable business and an influential position in Springfield. He established trading posts at Westfield, Northampton, Hadley, Hatfield, and Deerfield and held a number of public offices.

Bibliography

See J. C. Pynchon, Record of the Pynchon Family in England and America (1885; rev. by W. F. Adams, 1898).

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THE TOPIC: Through a career spanning a brief two decades, David Foster Wallace was primed to assume the mantle of the Next Great American Writer from postmodern icons such as Don DeLillo, Thomas Pynchon, John Barth, and Donald Barthelme.
His subjects include the writing of Thomas Pynchon, John Barth, Robert Coover, David Foster Wallace, Donald Barthelme, Don DeLillo and Richard Powers.
In the opinions of some ivory tower denizens, he moved beyond the abstruse postmodernism of Thomas Pynchon, John Barth, and Don DeLillo--American novelists who seemed to own the future of the canon in the 1970s and '80s.
Elias is at her best when analyzing individual novels (by a series of so-called First World authors including Thomas Pynchon, John Barth, Ishmael Reed, Leslie Marmon Silko, Charles Johnson and Charles Frazier) as illustrations of this paradox.
When Michiko Kakutani won the 1997 Pulitzer Prize for critical writing, the New York Times congratulated her on her brilliant reviews during the year of Philip Roth, Thomas Pynchon, John Updike, and Don DeLillo.