Pyrene

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Pyrene

 

an aromatic hydrocarbon; pale yellow crystals. Melting point 150°C; boiling point, 390°C. It is freely soluble in ether and benzene, and has limited solubility in alcohol; insoluble in water.

Pyrene is a constituent of the anthracene fraction in coal tar; it can be obtained from coal tar and petroleum cracking products. It is the raw material for the preparation of certain semifinished products in the manufacture of polycyclic dyes—for example, 3-nitropyrene, tetrachloropyrenequinone, and naph-thalene-l,4,5,8-tetracarboxylic acid.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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In conclusion, we established that the copolymers containing boronic acid and pyrene units can be utilized for the fluorometric sensing of [H.sub.2][O.sub.2].
Miyashita, "Characterization of the molecular environment of polymer Langmuir-Blodgett films using a pyrene fluorescent probe," Macromolecules, vol.
Tandem probes were constructed on the basis of synthesized pyrene conjugates (see Figure 2).
Upon the formation of duplex between pyrene conjugate of oligonucleotide and NA target, pyrene unit can either participate in stacking interactions with terminal base pairs of duplex [32, 33], intercalate into the duplex [34-39], or locate in one of the grooves [40, 41].
An introduction of one pyrene residue to the 5'-component IIa resulted in reduction of [T.sub.m] value of corresponding duplex (IV+IIa) x fcDNA by 4.5[degrees]C, thus, allowing to assume a pyrene unit to disturb cooperative interactions of tandem components.
Preliminarily found quantum efficiencies (see Table 1) for every conjugate revealed a substantial quenching of pyrene fluorescence.
Upon the formation of duplexes between individual tandem components and fcDNA target we observed further quenching of pyrene fluorescence (see Figures 3(a)-3(d)).
Pyrene has been found in complex organic mixtures at hazardous waste sites.
We studied pyrene-contaminated soil to determine contributions of soil or pyrene to PAH formation or modification (6), pyrene, uncontaminated soil, and pyrene-contaminated sand.
To probe for effects of silica, we contaminated samples of Ottawa Sand (EM Science, Gibbstown, NJ) with 4.89 ([+ or -] 0.10) wt% of pyrene using the same procedure as for soil (8,9).
This wash liquid sometimes contained fine particulates, especially at higher temperatures (~ 1,000 [degrees] C), which we presumed to be soot formed by pyrolysis of some pyrene. After approximately 20 min of sonication, each specimen of wash liquid was filtered.
The identity of some species with lower molecular masses (e.g., pyrene derivatives) was determined by gas chromatography (Hewlett-Packard Model 5890 Series II Plus) coupled to a mass selective detector (Hewlett-Packard Model 5972) using a cross-linked phenyl-methyl-siloxane stationary phase (Hewlett-Packard HP-5MS column, 0.25 mm i.d.