Pyrrho

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Pyrrho

(pĭr`ō), c.360–270 B.C., Greek philosopher, a native of Elis, regarded as the father of skepticismskepticism
[Gr.,=to reflect], philosophic position holding that the possibility of knowledge is limited either because of the limitations of the mind or because of the inaccessibility of its object. It is more loosely used to denote any questioning attitude.
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. After accompanying Alexander the GreatAlexander the Great
or Alexander III,
356–323 B.C., king of Macedon, conqueror of much of Asia. Youth and Kingship

The son of Philip II of Macedon and Olympias, he had Aristotle as his tutor and was given a classical education.
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 to Asia, he enjoyed great respect at Elis and Athens. His doctrines were preserved by his disciple, Timon of Phlius, in satires. Pyrrho taught that nothing can be known, because the contradictory of every statement can be maintained with equal plausibility. Hence the philosophic attitude is one of suspended judgment and imperturbability.

Pyrrho

?365--?275 bc, Greek philosopher; founder of scepticism. He maintained that true wisdom and happiness lie in suspension of judgment, since certain knowledge is impossible to attain
References in periodicals archive ?
The Skeptic Way: Sextus Empiricus's Outlines of Pyrrhonism. Trans, by Benson Mates.
(10.) For more on the recovery and transmission of Pyrrhonism in Renaissance Europe, see Popkin, The History of Scepticism from Savonarola to Bayle, 17-43; Charles Schmitt, Cicero Scepticus: The Influence of the Academica in the Renaissance (The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, 1972), 18-77; and Lucio Floridi, "The Diffusion of Sextus Empiricus' Works in the Renaissance," Journal of the History of Ideas 56, no.1 (1995): 63-85.
Everson, Stephen, "The Objective Appearance of Pyrrhonism." (Capitulo VII) en Psychology.
In Palmer's view, although the poet's notorious rejection of Providence and the immortal soul can in fact be linked to the development of atheism, "his materialism and the mitigated skepticism (as opposed to Pyrrhonism) of his weak empiricism would prove much more important to the development of modern thought" (238-39).
MACHUCA (ed.), Pyrrhonism in Ancient, Modern, and Contemporary Philosophy (Springer, Dordrecht, 2011) 131-144.
(2004) "Sextus Empiricus, Outlines of Pyrrhonism, Book I Sections 1-16, 18-27", Epistemology: The Classic Readings.
11.135; Plutarch, On Stoic Self-Contradictions 1044F-1045A; Sextus Empiricus, Outlines of Pyrrhonism 111.247-248.
Sextus Empiricus's Outlines of Pyrrhonism. Nueva York/ Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996.
My only reservation is with the description of Pyrrhonism as presenting 'an ad hominem argument'.
For Greco-Bactrians, the teachings of Buddha on the physical and metaphysical nature of reality were similar to the teaching of famous Greek philosophies--the Cynics, Skeptics, Sophists, Stoics, Democritus, Pythagoras, and Pyrrhonism.
There is a story of Pyrrho, the founder of Pyrrhonism, the old name for scepticism.
However, he sets a limit to skepticism and says that complete skepticism of the nature of pyrrhonism can lead to the death or end of a civilization (Eliot, Notes 29).