electrocardiogram

(redirected from QRS complexes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

electrocardiogram

[i‚lek·trō′kärd·ē·ə‚gram]
(medicine)
A graphic recording of the electrical manifestations of the heart action as obtained from the body surfaces. Abbreviated ECG; EKG.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stankovic, "On the parameterization of Hermite transform with application to the compression of QRS complexes," Signal Processing, vol.
This algorithm enables a detection of QRS complexes with 98.5 % reliability for ECG signals taken during body motion.
On the other hand, these algorithms cannot be achieved to apply on the signals obtained from different channels of ECG because T wave and QRS complexes orientations change.
The tachycardia and sinus rhythm QRS complexes may then be compared.
In the original algorithm of Pan and Tompkins, the size of the window is set to 150 ms wide that allows wider QRS complexes produced by the premature ventricular contractions (PVC) and merging of the QRS complexes with the T waves.
We hypothesized that fragmented QRS complexes (fQRS) may be useful for determining patients at high risk for new-onset postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) which is a frequent and serious complication of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery.
* Relative duration of RP and PR intervals can help to differentiate narrow QRS complex tachycardias based on the timing of the P wave with respect to adjacent QRS complexes. Those in which the RP interval is longer than the PR interval are called long RP tachycardies and include sinus tachycardia, intra-atrial tachycardia, atypical AVNRT, and AVRT with a slowly conducting ventriculoatrial pathway.
determined ECG disorder such as sinus tachycardia or bradycardia, bundle branch conduction defects, non-specific ventricular repolarization disturbances, supraventricular and ventricular extrasystoles, prolonged QT interval, low voltage of the QRS complexes in standard limb leads, atrioventricular block first-degree, and atrial fibrillation in patients with HFRS.
(39,53) The morphology of the QRS complexes is usually the same as in normal sinus rhythm--either narrow complex or exhibiting pre-existent bundle branch block.
The classic electrocardiographic changes associated with TdP include a wide complex QRS tachycardia, and a beat-to-beat axis deviation of the QRS complexes around the baseline that is referred to as the 'twisting of the points' (Landen, Schmidt, & Poponick, 2007).