QWERTY


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QWERTY

(hardware)
/kwer'tee/ (From the top left row of letter keys of most keyboards) Pertaining to a standard English-language typewriter keyboard (sometimes called the Sholes keyboard after its inventor), as opposed to Dvorak or foreign-language layouts (e.g. "keyboard AZERTY" in french-speaking countries) or a space-cadet keyboard or APL keyboard.

The QWERTY layout is a fine example of a fossil. It is sometimes said that it was designed to slow down the typist, but this is wrong; it was designed to allow *faster* typing - under a constraint now long obsolete. In early typewriters, fast typing using nearby type-bars jammed the mechanism. So Sholes fiddled the layout to separate the letters of many common digraphs (he did a far from perfect job, though; "th", "tr", "ed", and "er", for example, each use two nearby keys). Also, putting the letters of "typewriter" on one line allowed it to be typed with particular speed and accuracy for demos. The jamming problem was essentially solved soon afterward by a suitable use of springs, but the keyboard layout lives on.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

QWERTY keyboard

The standard typewriter keyboard layout used throughout the world. Q, W, E, R, T and Y are the letter keys starting at the top left, alphabetic row. Designed by Christopher Sholes, who invented the typewriter, the QWERTY arrangement was organized to prevent people from typing too fast and jamming the mechanical keys. The QWERTY layout was included in the drawing for Sholes' patent application in 1878. See keyboard, AZERTY keyboard and typewriter.

QWERTY LAYOUT

     Q W E R T Y U I O P
      A S D F G H J K L ; '   Home Row
       Z X C V B N M , . /



QWERTY Goes Way Back
This Hammond Multiplex typewriter, which used a QWERTY keyboard, was offered in 1913 with two fonts that could be quickly switched. (Equipment courtesy of Dorothy Hearn.)


QWERTY Goes Way Back
This Hammond Multiplex typewriter, which used a QWERTY keyboard, was offered in 1913 with two fonts that could be quickly switched. (Equipment courtesy of Dorothy Hearn.)







They Do Jam
Even QWERTY keys could jam if the person was a careless typist.
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References in periodicals archive ?
They claim normal users using a Qwerty keyboard on a touchscreen device were limited to typing at a rate of about 20 words per minute.
With these improvements, users were able to reach 37 words per minute, which is the best ever reported for two-thumb typing on touchscreen devices, significantly more than the approximate 20 words on a split QWERTY that regular users can achieve.
Stanford University economist Paul Krugman offered the central claim of this literature boldly and with admirable simplicity: "In QWERTY worlds, markets can't be trusted." The reason that he uses "QWERTY worlds," and not DOS worlds, or VHS worlds, is that the DOS and VHS examples are not very compelling.
The Aqua Qwerty also has a 5MP rear and a VGA front camera.
Much like the design of Qwerty, the researchers sought a design that minimised typing
A QWERTY layout has been retained in one version of the design, but BeeRaider has also created an optimised alpha-character efficient layout, which takes the frequency with which we use each character into account.
The handset features: full QWERTY keyboard; Wi-Fi calling capabilities; 5 megapixel camera with flash and autofocus; long battery life; a full HTML web browser with support for Adobe Flash; and a media player.
Based on years of scientific research MessagEase uses an ingenuous yet intuitive system of taps and slides for entering full text-taps for most frequent letters and slides for the rest, making its keyboard compact but with keys larger and easier to target than the soft QWERTY keys.
TI has a new, full-sized QWERTY keyboard for use with the TI-83 Plus, TI-83 Plus Silver, TI-89, TI-92 and Voyage 200 handhelds.
He likes to cite the QWERTY system on the typewriter keyboard and the triumph of VHS over Betamax as instances where a possibly inferior technology has become enshrined by the market.
Both devices come with QWERTY keyboards - the KEYone comes with a keyboard placed under the display, and the Priv comes with a slide-out keyboard that can be slid back under the display for full touch-screen usage.