Qajars

Qajars

 

(1) A Turkic tribe in Iran, numbering about 25, 000 (1970, estimate). The Qajars are concentrated in the Khazar-Jarib Valley in Mazandaran and the neighboring mountainous region in Gorgan. Some Qajars live in Tehran and certain other cities. In the late 18th century the Qajars increased in strength; from among them came the Qajar dynasty.

(2) A dynasty in Persia, which ruled from 1796 to 1925. On Oct. 31, 1925, the Fifth Majlis passed a resolution deposing the Qajar dynasty, and on December 12 it established the Pahlavi dynasty.

References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: PALACE--This is the old Niavaran Palace built under the Qajars, not the modern one built by Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi.
Abbott, Cities and Trade: Consul Abbott on the Economy and Society of Iran, edited by Abbas Amanat (London: Ithaca Press, 1983); Muhammad-'Ali Jamalzada, Ganj-i shayagan: awza'-i iqtisadi-yi Iran (Tehran: Sukhan, 2005); Hooshang Amirahmadi, The Political Economy of Iran under the Qajars: Society, Politics, Economics and Foreign Relations, 1976 to 1926 (London: LB.
The image of an enthroned and crowned king in the pictorial programmes of the Qajars was strengthened by the appropriation of pre-Islamic Iranian representations of kings--the monumental rock reliefs of the Sassanian kings (224-651), were particularly inspirational.
In the Monetary History of Iran: From the Safavids to the Qajars, the authors Rudi Matthee and Willem Floor say that a very small portion of the Indian loot was spent on building the infrastructure of the Persian Empire: most of it went to Nader Shah's private treasury and some to the soldiers and generals and courtiers.
The Qajars were a Turkmen tribe that held ancestral lands in present-day Azerbaijan.
In essence, the book is a history of American diplomatic reaction to British attempts to establish and consolidate imperial hegemony over Persia/Iran and of the dynastic transition from the Qajars, who had ruled over Iran since the late 18th century, to the Pahlevis, who were only to rule (subtracting the democratic interregnum represented by Prime Minister Mohammed Mossadeq, himself overthrown by the CIA in 1953 in favor of the original Shah's son) until the Islamic Revolution of 1979.
A well-argued, lucidly narrated and meticulously researched work, this volume mainly focuses on the development of the Shi'i ceremonies under three successive authoritarian regimes: Qajars, Pahlavis, and the Islamic Republic.
"They neglected study and education and did not occupy themselves with that justice with which they preserved their privileges," said Jabarti.(22) In Iran, the Usuli ulama ascendancy and the Qajars' consolidation of political power mutually reinforced each other.
Associating patriotism with the defense of Islam, the poet depicts Abbas Mirza as the champion of the faith who, in stark contrast to other Qajars, has sacrificed his comfort and luxury for the sake of the kingdom.
"The sheer number and variety of portraits under the Qajars is unprecedented," said Simon Rettig, the Freer Gallery of Art and the Sackler Gallery's assistant curator of Islamic art.
Representing the unpresentable; historical images of national reform from the Qajars to the Islamic Republic of Iran.
RELIGION, CULTURE AND POLITICS IN IRAN FROM THE QAJARS TO KHOMEINI By Joanna De Groot published by IB TAURIS ISBN 978 1 86064 571 6 price 39.50 [pounds sterling] hardback