Qasr Amrah

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Qasr Amrah

 

a palace of the Ommiads (Umayyads) in Jordan, located 65 km southeast of Amman; built in the second decade of the eighth century. The Roman-style baths and the reception hall are all that have been preserved. Their walls and ceilings are decorated with frescoes depicting scenes of hunting, games, and work, among others. The paintings show the influence of the traditions of Hellenistic and Roman art in Syria. The frescoes of Qasr Amrah are one of the most important artistic remains of the Arabian Caliphate.

REFERENCE

Musil, A. Kusejr ‘Amra[vols. 1–2]. Vienna, 1907.
References in periodicals archive ?
Azraq, May 27 (Petra) -- His Royal Highness Crown Prince Hussein Bin Abdullah II, on Wednesday, participated in the German charity Allgau-Orient-Rallye, as he crossed, along with 500 participants from Germany, European countries and Jordan, 25 kilometers in the desert, starting from Qeian Khanna area and arriving at Qasr Amra, in Azraq, eastern Jordan.
Jordan hosts a number of World Heritage sites, most famously the 2,000-year-old rose rock city of Petra -- but also Umm er-Rassas, a city dating back to the fifth century that features ancient Byzantine churches, and Qasr Amra, an eighth century Islamic castle.
With the arrival of the Crusaders in the area, the impressive castles of Karak and Shawbak were built, as well as Qasr Amra, an ancient bath house in the desert, where naturalistic and erotic frescoes adorn the interior of the building.