lobe

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lobe

1. any of the subdivisions of a bodily organ or part, delineated by shape or connective tissue
2. short for ear lobe
3. any of the loops that form part of the graphic representation in cylindrical coordinates of the radiation pattern of a transmitting aerial
4. any of the parts, not entirely separate from each other, into which a flattened plant part, such as a leaf, is divided
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

lobe

1. See antenna.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

lobe

[lōb]
(biology)
A rounded projection on an organ or body part.
(design engineering)
A projection on a cam wheel or a noncircular gear wheel.
(electromagnetism)
A part of the radiation pattern of a directional antenna representing an area of stronger radio-signal transmission. Also known as radiation lobe.
(engineering acoustics)
A portion of the directivity pattern of a transducer representing an area of increased emission or response.
(hydrology)
A curved projection on the margin of a continental ice sheet.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lobe

A segment of a circle in tracery; a foil.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

lobe

A curve representing the relative signal strength plotted against the position of the aerial with respect to a target. Side lobes are small lobes of energy radiated by radar aerials in diverging directions to the main beam—usually four, two at an angle of 7° from the main beam and two at angle of 90°. Side lobes may cause false weak echoes. An antenna pattern may have just one lobe, or it may have several lobes. Different lobes may have different magnitudes. The strongest lobe is called the main or major lobe. The weak lobes are called secondary or minor lobes.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved