Quadroon


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Quadroon

 

in Latin America and the southern USA, a person one of whose ancestors in the third generation (grandfather or grandmother) was a Negro. As a rule, quadroons are lighter skinned than mulattoes. The term “quadroon” has practically disappeared from use.

References in periodicals archive ?
quadroon, monsieur, and you are white, at least to look at you--you
Clark demonstrates that imagery and metaphors of the quadroon were embedded in the "press wars" of political factions incited by the Haitian Revolution in Philadelphia.
The figurative quadroon emerged as a necessary vehicle through which to neutralize the threat embodied in biracial procreating women: "The foreign females of color who migrate to the United States from the blood-soaked shores of Haiti could be mastered and controlled by white American men" (6).
Yet he is ultimately unable to move beyond his paternalistic, racist ideology according to which black people are "simple, good fellows" who will behave "obediently" when shown "kindness" and who "are not so far from dogs in that respect." Similarly, through Miss July's interaction with the quadroon Miss Clara, Levy shows how slavery's classification of people into "negro," "mulatto," "quadroon," "mustee," and "mustiphino" creates divisions and the damaging belief that the whiter one is, the better.
The image of the mulatta in the cottage is presented, and then twice revised in Clotel; the basic trope occurs with the quadroon protagonist, Clotel, for whom the work is named.
Indeed Woolf, although she often judged his fiction more positively, wrote to Lytton Strachey while preparing a review of two of Merrick's novels for the TLS and described Merrick as "a poor, unappreciated, second rate pot-boiling writer of stories about the stage, whom I deduce to be a negro mulatto or quadroon; at any rate he has a grudge against the world" (99).
For example, he addresses the complex racial makeup of various Creoles and their astonishingly precise social labels: "mulatto (black and white), griffe (black and mulatto), sacrato (black and griffe), marabon (mulatto and griffe), os rouge (black and Indian), quadroom (white and mulatto), tierceron (mulatto and quadroon), and octoroon (white and quadroon)" (p.
(That man, by the way, was Robert Campbell, a free "quadroon" who earned $400 a year at a Philadelphia Quaker school.) Through Gilmore's detailed investigative work, you'll meet every one of NEA's minority presidents, starting with Braulio Alonso, a Spanish-American who was the first at everything he did, continuing through Mary Hatwood Futrell, the daughter of a domestic worker, and most recently Reg Weaver.
The official Australian nomenclature of racial admixture never ventured beyond 'half-caste', 'quadroon', and 'octoroon', whereas in the United States a complicated nomenclature was able to precisely identify the degree of 'whiteness' of a mixed descendant to the seventh generation.
The writer suggested that Turpin and Hurston painted "their racial pictures, with little shading, in glistening blacks and lurid tans" and dismissed Hurston's novel as a story in which "an upstanding coffee-colored quadroon outlasts all three of her men--the last only because she was quicker on the trigger than he was--goes back to her village to rest in peace and to make her friends' eyes bug out at the tales of what she and life have done together" ("Negropings").
As Berman points out, Stowe in Uncle Tom's Cabin contests the institution of slavery by representing French colonial notions of the family that call into question rigid Anglo-American racial categories, as in the figure of the quadroon Cassy, who escapes from slavery in Louisiana.