Quaestors


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.
Related to Quaestors: Aediles

Quaestors

 

officials in ancient Rome.

Under the kings the quaestors were judges in criminal cases; under the republic they were junior magistrates, assistants to the consuls in financial matters, and, prior to 240 B.C., assistants in court cases as well. During the imperial period quaestors were responsible for paving roads, organizing the games, and publishing government edicts. The post of quaestor was held by patricians, but beginning in 421 B.C. it was opened to plebeians; it became the first stage of a political career. At first the quaestors were elected by the consuls; after 447 B.C., they were elected by the Comitia Tributa (a popular assembly). Initially there were two quaestors; beginning in 421 B.C. there were four (two serving in Rome and two being attached to commanders in chief on campaigns), and from 267 B.C. there were eight. During the rule of Sulla there were as many as 20 quaestors, and under Caesar the number grew to 40. Under the emperors the number reverted to 20.

References in periodicals archive ?
Bulgarian conservative GERB's MEP Andrey Kovachev has been elected to be among the five Quaestors of the European Parliament, the EPP group said in a statement.
The race was called by resolution of the Board of Senators Quaestors n.
However, Parliament Speaker Mihail Mikov did not demand electronic registration, the quaestors counted enough MPs in attendance, and the debates on the no-confidence vote were launched through a procedural trick.
Mikov, however, took advantage of a procedural trick, he did not demand electronic registration, and the quaestors counted enough MPs in attendance, after which the sitting was launched.