Qualified Majority


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Related to Qualified Majority: Qualified majority voting

Qualified Majority

 

an electoral majority of two-thirds, three-fourths, or the like; it differs from a simple majority, which is one vote over 50 percent. A qualified majority is usually required for adoption of the most important resolutions (for example, the introduction of amendments to constitutional laws). The Constitution of the USSR establishes that constitutional amendments by the Supreme Soviet of the USSR require a majority of not less than two-thirds of the votes in each chamber. A qualified majority is also needed for passing the verdict in a trial by jury.

References in periodicals archive ?
The fact that there is voting by qualified majority and unanimity in certain related policy domains has led to an uneven development of the social policy acquis.
Other aspects of social security require "qualified majority," where Germany has the most votes and Malta has the least.
The same qualified majority voting rules have prevented the 2010 cultivation proposal from being approved despite the support of a large majority of member states.
The Lisbon Treaty, which entered into force in December 2009, extends qualified majority voting to new policy areas, such as the budget, immigration, energy and humanitarian aid.
Again, it would need a qualified majority to be approved.
Language in the agreement on Qualified Majority Voting (QMV) means that over a wide raft of issues, the wishes of individual member states can now be overruled by a vote of the majority.
"Going back to 19-hour days in stuffy conference rooms, arguing with the mad British press about qualified majority voting and inter-governmental conference, I'm left wondering where life went wrong."
Other EU members are planning to force Britain to abandon its veto on tax issues and allow them to be decided by qualified majority voting.
In accordance with Tsebelis, I assume that the Council is composed of seven members with Euclidian preferences and that the qualified majority rule requires five votes.
To this end, the Single European Act replaced unanimous voting with "qualified majority voting" for the Council's adoption of most harmonization measures necessary to achieve the internal market.
It is proposed that the general meeting of a housing company could decide on demolition and new build by qualified majority of 4/5 of the votes cast in cases where the shareholders would receive apartments in the newly constructed building in accordance with the principle of equality.

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