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research

[ri′sərch]
(science and technology)
Scientific investigation aimed at discovering and applying new facts, techniques, and natural laws.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In making a call for a more explicit recognition and acceptance of the flexibility and fluidity of qualitative research, we view these characteristics as strengths rather than weaknesses of qualitative methods.
Typically, the article title includes the qualitative approach used in the study or at least acknowledges that the article is based on qualitative research. As with any journal publication, the purpose of the abstract is to provide a brief yet informative summary that encourages people to want to read more about the study.
This challenge is compounded by the promotion of qualitative clinical decision- making using the results of qualitative research with information on client preferences, experience, clinical context and resources for decision-making.
The continuous growth of interest in qualitative research in management studies that has been observed over the past decades (Lee, Mitchell, & Sablynski, 1999; Bluhm, Harman, Lee, & Mitchell, 2010) confirms the increased recognition of the strengths of qualitative inquiry with regard to issues of context and timing in organizational affairs (Langley, Smallman, Tsoukas, & Van de Ven, 2013).
Sample size in qualitative research is determined differently than in quantitative research.
Organized into four chapters, the book starts in Chapter 1 with some good background information about the importance of questions and critical lenses in qualitative research. Here it sets a welcoming tone, inviting "students of qualitative research and academic scholars who may want to use it as a companion book in their courses." (2) Chapter 2 is the most substantive chapter.
The main paradigms within the qualitative research are positivist, interpretive, and critical paradigms [Punch, 2013].
While reliability, validity, and generalization provide the basic, and well agreed upon, framework for evaluating quantitative research (MAYS and POPE, 1995), they may not be applied to the evaluation of qualitative research (SEALE, 1999).
Pernecky argues qualitative research requires a social ontology, a position that seeks to know and examine what is real about the social world.
No analogy to authenticity exists in quantitative research; this area represents the advantage of qualitative research to portray fully the deep meaning of a phenomenon to increases readers' understanding.
As seen in recent issues of Qualitative Research in Psychology, Journal of Exceptional Experiences, and the Journal of Parapsychology, with a few exceptions (e.g., Wooffitt, Holt, & Allistone, 2010), the recent studies that are applying qualitative methodologies to parapsychology are utilizing a phenomenological approach to examine the nature of specific psi experiences.

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