quantum entanglement

(redirected from Quantum nonlocality)
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quantum entanglement

[‚kwän·təm in′taŋ·gəl·mənt]
(quantum mechanics)
The property of two particles with a common origin whereby a measurement on one of the particles determines not only its quantum state but the quantum state of the other particle as well.
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The interpretation of quantum potential as the special "state" of ATPS in the presence of microscopic processes, can be also seen as a natural consequence which derives from quantum nonlocality.
The interpretation of quantum potential as the "state" of ATPS in presence of microscopic processes can also be seen as a natural consequence that derives from quantum nonlocality.
Walker then turns to an examination of quantum nonlocality, the notion that under certain circumstances two quantum particles cannot be considered to be separate entities independently operating in their own local regions of space.
Because of quantum nonlocality, the action of will transcends space.
It is generally believed that quantum nonlocality is observed only at the micro-level.
Since standard blueprint of observation of quantum nonlocal correlation is willingly unfit at the macro-limit, for formulation of experimentally verified hypothesis we have introduced dissipation in the framework of Cramer interpretation of quantum nonlocality by Weeler-Feynman action-at-a-distance electrodynamics.