Quarter-Wave Stub

quarter-wave stub

[′kwȯrd·ər ‚wāv ¦stəb]
(electromagnetism)
A section of transmission line that is one quarter-wavelength long at the fundamental frequency being transmitted; when shorted at the far end, it has a high impedance at the fundamental frequency and all odd harmonics, and a low impedance for all even harmonics. Also known as quarter-wave line; quarter-wave transmission line.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Quarter-Wave Stub

 

(also quarter-wave line), a section of a microwave transmission line that is a quarter-wavelength long at the fundamental frequency being transmitted. The input impedance of a quarter-wave stub is inversely proportional to its load impedance. This property of quarter-wave stubs makes it possible to use such stubs in many microwave devices, such as quarter-wave transformers and antenna switches.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
They use quarter-wave stub technology and are suitable for outdoor cable entry or antenna leads for telecommunications, wireless and commercial bands such as 3G, PCS, GSM, TETRA, UMTS and 802.11.
The lines to the right of points b-b' realize a simple, open-circuited quarter-wave stub. The input impedance of this stub is zero, and therefore, the points b and b' are electrically connected.
Mumford, "Tables of Stub Admittances for Maximally Flat Filters Using Shorted Quarter-wave Stubs," IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques, Vol.