Quebec campaign

Quebec campaign,

1775–76, of the American Revolution. The Continental Congress decided to send an expedition to Canada to protect the northern frontier from British attack and to persuade Canada to join the revolt against England. Late in Aug., 1775, Gen. Philip SchuylerSchuyler, Philip John
, 1733–1804, American Revolutionary general, b. Albany, N.Y. He was a member of one of the wealthiest colonial New York families. After serving in the French and Indian Wars he was a member of the New York assembly (1768–75) and of the Second
..... Click the link for more information.
 led troops up Lake Champlain and captured St. Johns; illness forced him to turn over his command to Gen. Richard MontgomeryMontgomery, Richard,
1738?–1775, American Revolutionary general, b. Swords, Co. Dublin, Ireland. After entering the British army, he was sent (1757) to Canada in the French and Indian Wars and saw action at Louisburg, Ticonderoga, and Montreal before participating in
..... Click the link for more information.
, who proceeded to capture Montreal in Nov., 1775. In Sept., 1775, General Washington sent Benedict ArnoldArnold, Benedict,
1741–1801, American Revolutionary general and traitor, b. Norwich, Conn. As a youth he served for a time in the colonial militia in the French and Indian Wars. He later became a prosperous merchant.
..... Click the link for more information.
 to lead an expedition against Quebec by way of the Kennebec and Chaudière rivers in Maine. When this force arrived, it was so weakened by the incredibly hard march, illness, desertion, and lack of supplies that Arnold was forced to wait for Montgomery before attacking. The unsuccessful assault was launched in the early morning of Dec. 31, 1775. The Continentals withdrew after Montgomery was killed, Arnold wounded, and Daniel MorganMorgan, Daniel,
1736–1802, American Revolutionary general, b. probably in Hunterdon co., N.J. He moved (c.1753) to Virginia and later served in the French and Indian Wars and several campaigns against Native Americans.
..... Click the link for more information.
 captured. Arnold and Montgomery's successor, David WoosterWooster, David
, 1711–77, American Revolutionary officer, b. Fairfield co., Conn. He served as an officer in the British army during the last of the French and Indian Wars.
..... Click the link for more information.
, continued the siege until spring, when British reinforcements enabled Sir Guy CarletonCarleton, Guy, 1st Baron Dorchester,
1724–1808, governor of Quebec and British commander during the American Revolution.
..... Click the link for more information.
 to push the Americans, now commanded by Gen. John Thomas, back to Crown Point on Lake Champlain.

Bibliography

See H. Bird, Attack on Quebec (1968).

References in periodicals archive ?
Heitman's Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army During the War of the Revolution, April 1775 to December 1783, Lowdon served in the Quebec Campaign in the force advancing on Quebec via the Hudson River Valley and was wounded at Montreal on 12 November 1775.
Smith survived the Quebec Campaign because he was absent at the time of the assault, likely ill as were 200 other members of Arnold's force.
After graduating, Madeline volunteered with the Workers Educational Association, teaching night classes to workers and trade unionists, and in 1942 she joined the Quebec campaign to unionize war workers, But it was in the cotton and woollen mills of Quebec that Madeline would truly make history.
Viewed through Hunter's eyes, the story of the Quebec campaign becomes the story of his personal quest for a lieutenant's commission in the Royal Navy.
In his unexpectedly successful Quebec campaign, Layton succeeded in blurring another divergence: that between ROC and Quebec progressives as to the level of government that should be primarily responsible for the welfare of the people.
The Ontario and Quebec campaigns did not produce the expected outcomes.

Full browser ?