Quedlinburg


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Quedlinburg

(kvād`lēnbo͝orkh), city (1994 pop. 26,853), Saxony-Anhalt, central Germany, at the foot of the lower Harz Mts. It is an industrial center and an agricultural market. Manufactures include engineering products, vehicles, paper, and precision instruments. The city is also a center for seed, flower, and sugar beet cultivation. One of the oldest German cities, Quedlinburg was fortified in 922 by Henry I (Henry the Fowler). It later became a member of the Hanseatic League. In 1698 the city passed to Brandenburg. The beautiful castle, church, and convent (secularized 1803) dominate the city from a hill; the age of the structures varies from the 10th to the 14th cent. Henry I and his wife, St. Matilda (who with her son, Emperor Otto I, founded the celebrated convent in 936), are buried in the castle church. Other historic structures in Quedlinburg include 14th-century fortifications, several early Gothic churches, and a 17th-century city hall. The city is the birthplace of the poet Klopstock (1724) and the geographer Karl Ritter (1779).
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Quedlinburg

 

a city in the German Democratic Republic, Halle District, on the Bode River (Elbe basin), in the northern foothills of the Harz. Population, 30,800 (1970).

Instruments, railroad cars, and dyes are manufactured in the city. Quedlinburg is the center of a truck-farming and vegetable-growing region. There is a plant-growing research institute. In Quedlinburg’s central section, surrounded by new buildings, are 14th-century fortifications, numerous half timber houses from the 15th to 18th centuries, and the Rathaus (14th to 17th centuries). On a cliff are a castle from the 16th to 18th centuries and the Church of St. Servatius (1070–1129) with a tenth-century crypt. To the west is the Wigbertikirche, a church with a crypt (a former palace chapel from the eighth and ninth centuries, rebuilt in the tenth century).

REFERENCE

Müller, H. Quedlinburg. Leipzig [1955].
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Next call on my itinerary was Quedlinburg, known as "The Cradle of Germany" featuring a collection of more than 1,300 half-timbered buildings dating back eight centuries.
Visiting Quedlinburg felt like finding a hidden treasure, something we could say about the whole Harz Mountains area.
Servatius church in Quedlinburg presented by Annah Kellogg-Krieg also has appropriate illustrations.
HIDDEN GEM The Harz mountains in Germany HISTORIC TREASURE - Timber-framed houses in picturesque in Quedlinburg
A typically picturesque street in Quedlinburg, a Unesco world heritage site Pictures: Harzer Tourismusverband (www.harzinfo.de) The steam train climbs up Brocken (left) and cable cars soar above the town of Thale
The reason for the celebration is as follows: in 1009, the name of Lithuania was first mentioned in writing when the German Quedlinburg chronicle stated, "In the year 1009, St.
A reasoned opinion is being sent to Germany concerning the construction of a tax office building in Quedlinburg by the German State of Saxony-Anhalt, a public works contract concluded in 2008 without previous execution of a tender procedure.
Sutelktomis paveldosaugininku pastangomis istorinis Kvedlinburgo centras nuosekliai tvarkomas ir pritaikomas pagal siuolaikine paskirti, nezalojant paveldo (world heritage Site Quedlinburg 2004).
(14) Mathilda, Otto I's daughter, became abbess of Quedlinburg when she was just eleven, while her cousin, Gerberga II (niece of Otto I and daughter of Henry, duke of Bavaria), joined Gandersheim at an equally early age.
for the most part eschews the works of great Augustinian thinkers like Giles, turning instead to one of its lesser known journeyman theologians, the lector Jordan of Quedlinburg. While Frater Jordanus was no original thinker, he was the author of the order's influential Liber Vitasfratrum, a text widely used to introduce novices to Augustinian ideals and commitments, particularly in the order's studia, schools for preachers and teachers.
But above and beyond the theoretical background, she asks: "Is it not possible that a cultural exchange between the two rival religions was more easily undertaken at the practical, everyday level of artistic workshops involving visual models than at the theoretical, exegetical, and theological level?" Hers is a valuable and lively account of the state of research regarding the Quedlinburg Itala and the Saint Augustine's Gospels.