Liliuokalani

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Liliuokalani

(lēlēo͞o'ōkälä`nē), 1838–1917, last reigning queen of the Hawaiian Islands. She ascended the throne in 1891 upon the death of her brother, King Kalakaua. Her refusal to recognize the constitutional changes inaugurated in 1887 precipitated a revolt, fostered largely by sugar planters (mostly American residents of Hawaii), that led to her dethronement early in 1893 and the establishment of a provisional government. Failing in an attempt to regain the throne in 1895, she formally renounced her royal claims. Much of the remainder of her life was spent in the United States, where she unsuccessfully entered against the federal government claims totaling $450,000 for property and other losses. The territorial legislature of Hawaii finally voted her an annual pension of $4,000 and permitted her to receive the income from a sugar plantation of 6,000 acres (2,428 hectares). She wrote many songs, including the popular "Aloha Oe," or "Farewell to Thee."

Liliuokalani

Lydia Kamekeha . 1838--1917, queen and last sovereign of the Hawaiian Islands (1891--95)
References in periodicals archive ?
The program segued into the dance as shaped by the forces of history: foreign domination, a phase that included its prohibition by the fanatic New England missionaries who correctly recognized it as a threat to their crusade; the reign of King Kalakaua, Hawaii's Merrie Monarch, who rescued the art, by then considerably Europeanized; the overthrow of Queen Lili'uokalani, which led to annexation and statehood and the near-disappearance of kahiko; exposure to Hollywood and the tourist industry; and, finally, increased ethnic awareness, the context of the Hawaiian renaissance.
Among Gray's fascinatingly bilingual poets is Queen Lili'uokalani of Hawaii, who composed mele in Hawaiian "for competitions held by singing clubs of the Hawaiian court," and translated them into an English that preserved some Hawaiian words heavily weighted with traditional poetic significance.
The Queen Lili'uokalani Race ends with the Ali'i Challenge, a 17.5 mile race for 12-member crews, featuring two triangle courses as well as a land portion with tasks that will require knowledge of Kailua-Kona and Kamakahonu history and culture.
This year's Queen Lili'uokalani Race is made possible by Queen K Tesoro Hawaii, Steinlager, Hawaii Tourism Authority, the County of Hawaii, King Kamehameha's Kona Beach Hotel, and Olukai.
After all this talk of redemption, regrets and reapers, a mischievous Cash emerges on Queen Lili'uokalani's "Aloha Oe," which closes out the album, as well as the "American Recording" series.