queen

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queen

1. a female sovereign who is the official ruler or head of state
2. the wife or widow of a king
3. 
a. the only fertile female in a colony of social insects, such as bees, ants, and termites, from the eggs of which the entire colony develops
b. (as modifier): a queen bee
4. an adult female cat
5. one of four playing cards in a pack, one for each suit, bearing the picture of a queen
6. a chess piece, theoretically the most powerful piece, able to move in a straight line in any direction or diagonally, over any number of squares

queen

[kwēn]
(invertebrate zoology)
A mature, fertile female in a colony of ants, bees, or termites, whose function is to lay eggs.

Queen

(dreams)
In African folklore, the King is said to be “the one who holds all life, human and cosmic, in his hands; the keystone of society and the universe.” In the modern world, we may not associate the King with ultimate power, knowledge, or wisdom. However, historically the mythical King was highly spiritual, was the center of the wheel of life, and was said to have a regulatory function in the cosmos. Psychologically, the king and the queen are said to be the “archetypes of human perfection.” As a dream symbol, you can understand the king or queen in your dream by realizing that they represent your ability for independence, self-understanding, and self-determination. They also represent inner wealth that will enable you to be your best and help you to achieve your goals. Consciously, you may never have the desire to be a king or queen, but psychologically, these figures are symbolic of our highest potential and our desire to be the “king or queen” of our own world and our own lives. On rare occasions and depending on the details of the dream, the king and queen may represent a powerful force that is unkind and tyrannical.
References in periodicals archive ?
Faerie Queene I, vii, 16-18; apud Hamilton et al 2006: 108, 109, 434, 588; Protestants saw in this beast a symbol of "Rome with its seven hills"; cf.
Reflecting upon the difficulty of The Faerie Queene's nominal project in a post-Petrarchan literary climate, Greene observes, "The process of fashioning is frustrated by the inconsistency of the clay amid the quicksand of history." (32) Containment (and later contentment) fosters a more solid footing for Spenser's artistic objectives.
It is here that Duessa first begins to take up the practice of slander to lead others into conflict, which will serve as a recurring theme for her actions in the following books of The Faerie Queene. Her attempt to lead Guyon into battle with the Redcrosse Knight, however, proves futile as the Knight of Temperance holds a greater faith in the words of his fellow knight and swiftly befriends Redcrosse.
He then adds, "The other masterpiece of English poetry whose influence is most apparent in Perelandra is Spenser's Faerie Queene," for which he summarizes examples:
WHY DOES PROFESSOR HADFIELD not just tell the truth, that the regime that Spenser wrote The Faerie Queene to glorify was in many respects revolutionary and often appalling?
About 1580 he began to write an epic poem, 12 chapters long, called The Faerie Queene. Spenser told of Elizabeth's reign as an allegory by using made-up characters and events as symbols for real people and history.
Thus their prayers for the monarch join further prayers for a series of people most of whom will not be present at the performance, and some of whom cannot even be guaranteed to approve of it: the nobility, the commonweal in general and, most often, as Brathwait and Holles had made clear, the privy council "our Noble Queene Elesabeth, to you we commend, ...
While Majeske's conclusion about Utopia is not new, his study of Book V of The Faerie Queene arrives at a persuasive political reading.
In chapter 5, Wells chronicles in depth Spenser's movement from love melancholy to its medieval antecedent, acedia, as famously did Petrarch in his Secretuin, by showing in Arthur's dream of a Faerie Queene how the lost object can be replaced with a substitute sign.
In a lively, relaxed transcription of her 2002 Kathleen Williams Lecture, Lauren Silberman addresses the current state of political approaches to The Faerie Queene, and how the text may be read to deepen and nuance--without apologizing for--Spenser's own political biases.
In The Faerie Queene, Spenser's pastoral vision of Ireland is at its most extensive in Book 6, with Calidore, especially, embodying the experience and dilemmas of the new English settlers.
The six-ton saddle-tank locomotive, built in 1905 in Leeds, is named after one of the characters in Spenser's Faerie Queene