Queens


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to Queens: List of Queens

Queens,

borough of New York City (1990 pop. 1,951,598), land area c.109 sq mi (293 sq km), on the western portion of Long Island, SE N.Y., coextensive with Queens co.; settled by the Dutch 1635, established as a New York City borough 1898. Having the largest area of the city's boroughs, it extends from the junction of the East River and Long Island Sound in the north, across Long Island to Jamaica Bay and the Atlantic Ocean in the south. It is connected with Manhattan by the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge, the Queens-Midtown Tunnel, and railroad and subway tunnels; with the Bronx and Manhattan by the Robert F. Kennedy (formerly Triborough) Bridge; with the Bronx by the Hell Gate railroad bridge and by the Bronx-Whitestone and Throgs Neck bridges. The borough has c.200 mi (320 km) of waterfront. It is industrialized in Long Island City; there and at Sunnyside are extensive railroad yards. Astoria, Flushing, Queens Boulevard, Rego Park, and Jamaica (seat of St. John's Univ.) are industrial and commercial centers. Among the many residential communities are Flushing (Queens College is there), Forest Hills, and Kew Gardens. The Rockaways are a popular beach area.

The first settlements were made by the Dutch in 1635. Queens co. was organized in 1683, the main settlements were Flushing, Jamaica, and Newtown (later Elmhurst). Several buildings of the 17th and 18th cent. remain. One of the first commercial nurseries in the country was established c.1737, and the community's collection of trees still includes several rare species. In the American Revolution, British troops held the area after the battle of Long Island (1776). The western portions of Queens co. voted to join New York City in 1898; the eastern section became Nassau co. In the 20th cent. growth was spurred with the opening of the Blackwell's Island Bridge (now the Ed Kock Queensboro Bridge, 1909) and a railroad tunnel (1910). After World War II there was a boom in housing construction.

Queens is the most ethnically diverse county in the United States, with large populations of immigrants, primarily E and S Asians and Hispanics. It is the site of La Guardia Airport and John F. Kennedy International Airport. Two World's Fairs (1939–40; 1964–65) were held in Flushing Meadows–Corona Park. The Queens Museum; the United States Tennis Association Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, site of the U.S. Open; Citi Field, home of the New York Mets (baseball); and a botanic garden are now located in the park. Also in the borough are the P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center and Aqueduct racetrack. Parts of Jamaica Bay and the Rockaway peninsula (including former U.S. Fort Tilden) are included in the Gateway National Recreation Area.

Bibliography

See V. F. Seyfried, Old Queens, New York (1990).

King’s (Queen’s) Bench, Court of

 

one of the oldest judicial institutions in Great Britain. The Court of King’s Bench was separated from the Curia Regis and made a special curia in 1178. Initially, it traveled about the country in the royal entourage. Subsequently, it came to deal primarily with important criminal cases; it also supervised the activity of the lower courts. It played an important role in the emergence of the common law. In the 19th century the Court of King’s Bench was made a division of the High Court of Justice. Since the reform of 1971, its competence has been limited to civil-law disputes.

Queens

a borough of E New York City, on Long Island. Pop.: 2 225 486 (2003 est.)
References in classic literature ?
said the Queen, tossing her head impatiently; and, turning to Alice, she went on, `What's your name, child?
In truth it was a talisman which the Queen of China had given her daughter, telling her it would ensure her happiness as long as she carried it about her.
Well, since the best motives are liable to misconstruction, the queen saw in your refusal nothing but a refusal -- a distinct refusal she had also much to complain of you during the lifetime of the late cardinal; yes, her majesty the queen "
This sounded nonsense to Alice, so she said nothing, but set off at once towards the Red Queen.
His majesty, a prince of much gravity and austere countenance, not well observing my shape at first view, asked the queen after a cold manner "how long it was since she grew fond of a SPLACNUCK?
The Wicked Queen knowing this made every attempt to get the Prince out of the country, but her efforts failed, till one day accident did what she was unable to accomplish.
And I am but a sorry page," replied Marian; "for I had clean forgot that I was Richard Partington, and really did bring you a message from Queen Eleanor
A Florentine adventurer, sire, and that was all; while the august spouse of your Majesty is Anne of Austria, Queen of France--that is to say, one of the greatest princesses in the world.
He immediately conjectured that the queen had a request to make of him.
At that moment several mice were seen running up as fast as their little legs could carry them, and when they saw their Queen they exclaimed:
But this queen died; and the king soon married another wife, who became queen, and was very beautiful, but so vain that she could not bear to think that anyone could be handsomer than she was.
Young Partington poured forth the bright yellow wine and holding the glass aloft, cried, "Here is to the health and long happiness of my royal mistress, the noble Queen Eleanor; and may my journey and her desirings soon have end, and I find a certain stout yeoman men call Robin Hood.