Queer theory


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Queer theory

an approach to issues of sex and gender which has primarily arisen out of postmodernist thought. Queer theory rehabilitates the pejorative term ‘queer’ in order to denote nonconformist sexualities (not necessarily homosexualities) which serve to subvert and confront conventional categories of GENDER and SEXUALITY. These sexualities may include transgressive acts such as sadomasochism and the production of PORNOGRAPHY, TRANSVESTISM and gay camp.

In emphasizing the ‘performative’ aspects of gender and sexuality, Queer theory emphasizes their unnaturalness. From this perspective there are no fundamental identities underlying maleness or femaleness, HOMOSEXUALITY or HETEROSEXUALITY. Emanating from Queer Theory, queer politics seeks to destabilize and collapse existing categories of gender and sexuality. Both Queer theory and Queer politics may be regarded as coming into conflict with FEMINISM generally and lesbian feminism in particular. By emphasizing sexual pleasure as unproblematized they fail to address the role played by sexual politics in the subordination of women. (See S. Wilkinson and C. Kitzinger, 1994.)

References in periodicals archive ?
Queer theory feminism would similarly be interested in the multiplicities and ambivalences of sexuality, though its focus would not be on liberal conceptions of consent.
That lecture, A Map of Feminist and Queer Theories of Sexuality and Sexual Regulation, (10) formed the basis of what was to become, under the signature of Ian Halley, Queer Theory by Men, the feature essay in this issue of the Duke Journal of Gender Law and Policy.
Holly Lewis's The Politics of Everybody: Feminism, Queer Theory and Marxism at the Intersection (2016) also merged (post)identity politics and Marxist politics.
Thinking Sex is primarily metacritical: it deals with a range of other critical and theoretical work in queer theory and sexuality studies, in the disciplines of literature and history.
I do take issue with the resistance to psychoanalysis both in surface reading and in the reparative turn in queer theory.
PMLA in 1995 had essays on "male transvestite theater," "The Homoerotics of Orientalism," John Donne's "Homopoetics," "Birth of the Cyberqueer," and "What Does Queer Theory Teach Us about X?
Part III, "The Stakes of Gender," continues to build on the concerns of Parts I and II while also considering the role of gender in early modern queer studies, including new ways of looking at sex and gender in Shakespeare's sonnets and what a method that retheorizes the lesbian might add to both the history of sexuality and queer theory.
In the introduction, "Depression, Biology, Aggression," Wilson lays out the book's main arguments and situates them in relation to current scholarship in feminist theory, queer theory, and the neuroscientific humanities.
Queer theory "looks with skepticism at the processes of how identities are constructed, and, in this way, learning becomes a way of risking the self as much as it does constructing the self" (Luhmann, 2009, p.
Concept essays pair such themes as consumerism and queer theory with time lines, charts, photos, artwork, and stylized cartoons.