Quelimane


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Quelimane

(kĕlĭmä`nē), town (1989 est. pop. 78,500), capital of Zambézia province, E central Mozambique, a seaport on the Rio dos Bons Sinais near its mouth in the Indian Ocean. It is a trade center and terminus of a railroad extending c.100 mi (160 km) into the interior. Exports include palm products, sisal, and tea. Fishing is an important industry, and the town has one of the world's largest coconut plantations. The Portuguese founded a trading station at Quelimane in 1544, and the town was an important slave market in the 18th and 19th cent. The name is also spelled Quilimane, Kilimane, and Kilimani.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Quelimane

 

a city in Mozambique; administrative center of the district of Zambézia . Population, 20,000 (1968). Quelimane is a port on the Mozambique Channel, at the mouth of the Cuácua River. It has a railroad station. Sugar, sisal, cotton, copra, tea, and tobacco are exported. The city is the center of an agricultural region.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thirty-nine-year-old housekeeper Fatima dos Santos, made a 1,600-kilometre (1,000-mile) trip from the central city of Quelimane for the historic opportunity to see the pontiff.
Based in Maputo, Mozambique's capital, Ethiopian Mozambique Airlines serves 8 domestic points in Mozambique including the capital Maputo, Nampula, Tete, Pemba, Beira, Nacala, Quelimane, Vilankulos and Chimoio.
This was especially worrisome as Inhassunge is the district closest to Quelimane city, the capital of Zambezia province and the location of the provincial warehouse.
Besides imaging the whole set, it was chosen to digitize the 1951-56 period for the following stations: Beira, Inhambane, Quelimane, Mossuril, Murrebue, Tete, Vila Cabral, and Lumbo.
Another area of focus will be the rehabilitation of the primary road network, specifically the sections of N1 and N10 (Quelimane to Namacurra - 70 km), which have an average annual daily traffic ranging from 1,700 to 2,600 vehicles.
In the Quelimane Municipality for example, which lies in the center of Mozambique's coast, mayor Manuel de Araujo has invested in mangroves.
White (1980) Capitalism and Colonialism in Mozambique: a study of Quelimane district.