Quemoy


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Related to Quemoy: Jinmen, Kinmen Island

Quemoy

(kĭmoi`), Chin. Chinmen, Kinmen, or Jinmen, Taiwanese island group (1990 pop. 81,479), Taiwan Strait, just off Fujian prov., China, and c.150 mi (240 km) W of Taiwan. The group consists of the islands of Kinmen and Liehyu (or Little Kinmen) and 12 islets in the mouth of Xiamen Bay. The town of Kinmen, on Kinmen island, is the chief population center. Farming is the main occupation; about half the land is under cultivation. Crops include sweet potatoes, peanuts, sorghum, barley, wheat, soybeans, vegetables, and rice. Fishing and especially tourism are also important; many sites on Kinmen and Lieyu are preserved in Kinmen National Park. Kinmen island has extensive fortifications, but the government began removing minefields and demilitarizing the island in 2006.

After the Communist victory on mainland China (1949), Quemoy and MatsuMatsu
or Ma-tsu
, Taiwanese island, in the East China Sea, off Fujian prov., China, E of Fuzhou, and c.100 mi (160 km) from Taiwan. Along with Quemoy, it remained a Chinese Nationalist outpost after the Communist victory on the mainland in 1949.
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 remained Nationalist outposts. For many years the islands were subjected to periodic bombardment from the Communist mainland. An incident in 1958 led to the deployment of the U.S. 7th Fleet, but an escalation of hostilities was avoided. The islands are no longer an important point of contention, and Taiwan reduced the military forces stationed there after 1990. Civilian rule was restored in 1993, and restrictions on travel to Quemoy were ended in 1994. Direct travel to and trade with the mainland has been permitted since Jan., 2001, and Kinmen island is now popular with Chinese tourists visiting Taiwan.

Quemoy

an island in Formosa Strait, off the SE coast of China: administratively part of Taiwan. Pop. (with associated islets): 53 237 (1996 est.). Area: 130 sq. km (50 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
Starting on 23 August 1958, the United States sought to compel China to abandon its bombardment of the Quemoy and Matsu Islands in the Taiwan Strait and to deter it from further aggression against Republic of China (ROC) forces.
Kinmen, also known as Quemoy, was formerly a military base but has since transformed into a tourist spot amid increasing exchanges between Taiwan and China, as has Matsu, another Taiwanese-controlled island group off the coast of Fujian.
Truman wrote of the time "[w]hen Eisenhower went to Korea and surrendered," seeing it as the cause of troubles in 1958 over Chiang Kai-shek's efforts to keep the islands of Quemoy and Matsu from being taken by mainland China (206).
In 1955, the US Navy was patrolling the Formosa (Taiwan) Strait, convinced that the PRC was about to seize the Quemoy and Matsu islands.
In the early Cold War years, when China was firmly rooted in the Soviet camp and Taiwan in the American camp, there was one major armed conflict--the 1958 Quemoy Crisis--between China and Taiwan.
Kien-hong YU is a professor at National Quemoy University, Taiwan.
Uno de esos momentos fue el lanzamiento de las bombas A sobre el Japon; otro lo fue la decision acerca de Corea; lo fueron tambien la confusion acerca de Quemoy y de Matsu, asi como anteriormente Dien bien fu; otro "momento" semejante fue la serie de maniobras que complicaron a los Estados Unidos en la Il Guerra Mundial.
During the first Taiwan Strait Crisis in 1954, China began shelling the offshore islands Quemoy and Matsu, threatening to "liberate" Taiwan.
There was more tension with the Americans over the islands of Quemoy and Matsu, in the straits of Taiwan after the Korean War.
Chinese leader Mao Zedong to end the Quemoy and Matsu crisis and in 1953
Hsing-Kuo Wang, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Business Administration, National Quemoy University, Kinmen, Taiwan, ROC; Jung-Feng Tseng, doctoral candidate, School of Human Resource Management, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC; Yu-Fang Yen, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Business Administration, National Quemoy University, Kinmen, Taiwan, ROC; Ing-Chung Huang, PhD, Professor, Department of Asia-Pacific Industrial and Business Management, National Kaohsiung University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC.