queen

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queen

1. a female sovereign who is the official ruler or head of state
2. the wife or widow of a king
3. 
a. the only fertile female in a colony of social insects, such as bees, ants, and termites, from the eggs of which the entire colony develops
b. (as modifier): a queen bee
4. an adult female cat
5. one of four playing cards in a pack, one for each suit, bearing the picture of a queen
6. a chess piece, theoretically the most powerful piece, able to move in a straight line in any direction or diagonally, over any number of squares

queen

[kwēn]
(invertebrate zoology)
A mature, fertile female in a colony of ants, bees, or termites, whose function is to lay eggs.

Queen

(dreams)
In African folklore, the King is said to be “the one who holds all life, human and cosmic, in his hands; the keystone of society and the universe.” In the modern world, we may not associate the King with ultimate power, knowledge, or wisdom. However, historically the mythical King was highly spiritual, was the center of the wheel of life, and was said to have a regulatory function in the cosmos. Psychologically, the king and the queen are said to be the “archetypes of human perfection.” As a dream symbol, you can understand the king or queen in your dream by realizing that they represent your ability for independence, self-understanding, and self-determination. They also represent inner wealth that will enable you to be your best and help you to achieve your goals. Consciously, you may never have the desire to be a king or queen, but psychologically, these figures are symbolic of our highest potential and our desire to be the “king or queen” of our own world and our own lives. On rare occasions and depending on the details of the dream, the king and queen may represent a powerful force that is unkind and tyrannical.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hall refers to Suffolk in The Union (11) as "the Quenes dearlynge William Duke of Suffolke" who is "entierly loued" by the Queen.
Wyth that, Dame Tryamour to the quene geth, And blew on her swych a breth That neuer eft mygt sche se.
RECS will certainly help Member States to reach their indicative targets and to build their support mechanisms", says Marjolein Quene, who hopes "RECS will be a first step in the harmonisation of different support mechanisms as it will prevent double support".
romanzoffiana * Archaeological site Gruta do Lapa Ponta Gentio Pe- da Guajara II quene Cabeca Species (Bra) (Bra) (Bra) (Bra) Acromia aculeata Acrocomia hassleri Aiphanes cf.
Nothing is known of his relations with Shakespeare hereafter either, except indirectly through an extant note of 1604 from Sir Walter Cope to Robert Cecil, sent by Burbage, saying that according to Burbage, "ther ys no new playe that the quene [Anne] hath not seene," but the company has revived an old one, Love's Labour's Lost, which will please her exceedingly and "ys apointed to be playd to Morowe night at my Lord of Sowth amptons.
10 The Discourse touching the pretended Match betweene the Duke of Norfolk and the Quene of Scottis, attributed to 'Sampson', a preacher, is reprinted in Anderson, Collections, vol.
For the preseruacyon, of Henry, our m[ost no]ble kynge And katherine/our Quene, that they togyther may
spaec (space) quene (queen) rool (rule) maek (make)
He also left an amusing burlesque, "The Justing and Debait up at the Drum betuix William Adamsone and Johine Sym," and a ceremonial alliterative poem, "Ane New Yeir Gift to Quene Mary .
In the name of god amen the ffourthe daye of maye in the yere of our lorde god a thousand ffyve hundereth fyftye and seven and the thirde and ffourthe yeres of the Raygnes of kynge Phillipe and Quene mary I Nycholas ludford of the Cyttye of westminster being hole In bodye and perfyght in Remembraunce do make this my testament and laste wyll in maner and forme as hereafter foloyth.
See The Passage of our most drad Soueraigne Lady Quene Elyzabeth through the citie of London to westminster the daye before her coronacion (London, 1558), fol.
This proxy object transparently and asynchronously relays the requests to the active server object's request quene, and returns the results of requests which are asynchronously delivered to its result queue by the server.