Queneau


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Queneau

Raymond . 1903--76. French writer, influenced in the 1920s by surrealism. His novels include Zazie dans le m?tro (1959)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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(3) Queneau's texts combine depth psychology, history, and philosophy in his own versions of utopia.
Leconte also reads Queneau influenced Jean Echenoz and Goncourt prize winning Patrick Modiano, whose 1992 "Honeymoon" is a hauntingly evocative novel about a documentary filmmaker.
Here it is evident that Calvino shared Queneau's passion for a literature modeled after playful mathematical calculations.
Iris once exclaimed: "Part of me wants to be Raymond Queneau, another wants to be Thomas Mann," and she never fully integrated the fantastic and realistic elements in her work.
The magazine cover-photo of Catherine Demongeot pays homage to Queneau's novel as well as Louis Malle's film and her performance in it, yet, combined with the book Angela reads, the photo supplies additional significance.
They are Le Chevalier du papegau, an anonymous prose romance thought to date from the fourteenth century (though it could be as late as the fifteenth); Gresset's satirical poem Ver-Vert (1734); Voltaire's philosophical story Le Blanc et le noir (from 1764); Queneau's Zazie dans le metro and Jean Echenoz's Cherokee.
RAYMOND QUENEAU (1903-1976), French writer, poet, encyclopedist, and critic, wrote seventeen novels, including Zazie dons le M[acute{e}]tro and Le Chiendent.
New Directions was the publisher--and almost always the first m publisher in the United States--of Apollinaire, Djuna Barnes, Bei Dao, Borges, Paul Bowles, Brecht, Camus, Cela, Celine, Cendrars, Char, Cocteau, Dahlberg, Daumal, Durrell, Eluard, Endo, Garcia Lorca, Hawkes, Hesse, Huidobro, Isherwood, Jarry, Joyce, Kafka, Lautreamont, Merton, Michaux, Henry Miller, Mishima, Montale, Nabokov, Neruda, Parra, Pasternak, Paz, Queneau, Raja Rao, Reverdy, Rilke, Rimbaud, Sartre, Sebald, Supervielle, Svevo, Tabucchi, Dylan Thomas, Ungaretti, Valery, Vittorini, Nathanael West and Tennessee Williams.
They were inspired by Alfred Jarry and Raymond Queneau, whose Exercices de style (1947; Exercises in Style) consisted of a single anecdote presented in 99 different forms demonstrating different figures of speech, style, and other literary elements.
Recommendations to write 'ghost chapters' and to emulate Raymond Queneau's Exercices en style may, however, work randomly without some theoretical connection being made between fiction and trope.