quercetin

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quercetin

[′kwer·sə·tən]
(biochemistry)
C15H5O2(OH)5 A yellow, crystalline flavonol obtained from oak bark and Douglas-fir bark; used as an antioxidant and absorber of ultraviolet rays, and in rubber, plastics, and vegetable oils.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although red wine contains more varieties of antioxidants, both red and white contain some of the most powerful antioxidants in nature [ETH] resveratrol, quercitin and epicatechin.
Some are aware that onions have anti-inflammatory properties, but they are also rich in chromium, vitamin C and numerous flavonoids, most notably quercitin.
The role of rutin and quercitin in stimulating Ravonol glycosidase activity by cultured cell-free microbial preparations of human feces and saliva.
5 fiber, 14 sugar) Contains vitamin C, folic acid, calcium, phosphorus, iron, zinc, quercitin and omega-3 fatty acids.
To block the histamine released by the body, he uses either a root called butterbur or the antioxidant quercitin.
Quercitin is a strong bioflavinoid that stabilizes the mast cells that release histamines.
Quercitin (a flavonoid of vitamin C)--30-100 mg twice a day.
Walter Crinnion, a naturopath in Kirkland, Washington, recommends quercitin for allergies.
Researchers believe it may be due to an antioxidant called quercitin, which is found in hard fruits.
They also plan one for flavonoids, including catechins in tea, naringin and taxifolin in citrus, and quercitin in onions, apples, and red wine.
Inderjit and Dakshini (1995b) found that quercitin concentrations in soils associated with Pluchea lanceolata were higher with regular cultivation.
In the second volume typical chapters are Phenolic compounds in food and cancer prevention; Plant phenolic compounds as inhibitors of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis; Natural antioxidants from spices; Soybean (malonyl) isoflavones - characterization and antioxidant properties; Antioxidant defence systems generated by phenolic plant constituents; Phenolic antioxidants as inducers of anticarcinogenic enzymes; Custom design of better in vivo antioxidants structurally related to vitamin E; Molecular characterization of quercitin and quercitin glycosides in Allium vegetables - their effects on malignant cell transformation; and so on down a further long list of titles.