Quicksand

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quicksand

a deep mass of loose wet sand that submerges anything on top of it

Quicksand

 

sand saturated with water from anabatic sources and capable, consequently, of sucking down objects, animals, and humans falling into it. There are many kinds of quicksand, but all types lack an admixture of silt. Owing to the thin film of water enveloping the grains of sand, adhesion between them is sharply reduced, and quicksand behaves almost like a liquid: submersion of a foreign body continues until the weight of the sand displaced by it is equal to the weight of the body itself. Quicksand is generally confined to the shores of seas, lakes, and rivers (where anabatic sources are usually found), but may occur far from shores in both plains and mountains.


Quicksand

 

water-saturated earth that is able to flow and shift.

Quicksand may be loose or fairly loose sandy loam, finegrained and powdery loose sand, or soil containing colloidal particles less than 0.001 mm in size that act as a lubricant. Quicksand containing colloidal particles is termed true quicksand, according to the classification of the Soviet scientist A. F. Lebedev (1935). The properties of false quicksand, on the other hand, are manifested only under considerable hydrodynamic pressure of the water filtering through it. True quicksand expands greatly when frozen, has low filterability, and becomes cohesive when it dries; microorganisms play a major role in its formation.

Quicksand is controlled by drainage. True quicksand is slow to yield water and therefore vacuuming and electrical drainage are used in draining it. For draining false quicksands, needle filters and tubular wells are used. A soil’s “quick” condition becomes revealed under dynamic stress and with the development of hydrodynamic pressure in the water saturating the soil. The properties of quicksand are taken into consideration in construction and mining projects that make use of shields and caissons and the method of freezing the soil.

M. V. MALYSHEV

What does it mean when you dream about quicksand?

Quicksand may symbolize losing one’s footing and sinking into the quicksand of one’s emotions or the unconscious. Dreaming about being in quicksand may reflect circumstances in the business or personal life of the dreamer that are beyond the dreamer’s control.

quicksand

[′kwik‚sand]
(geology)
A highly mobile mass of fine sand consisting of smooth, rounded grains with little tendency to mutual adherence, usually thoroughly saturated with upward-flowing water; tends to yield under pressure and to readily swallow heavy objects on the surface. Also known as running sand.
(materials)
A loose sand mixture with a high proportion of water, thus having a low bearing pressure.

quicksand

Fine sand, sometimes with an admixture of clay, which is saturated with water so that it has no bearing capacity at its surface; fine sand in a quick condition.

Quicksand

(dreams)
You may be experiencing feelings of helplessness and an inability to get out of a situation in your daily life. This common sense approach can easily be applied and with some effort you can examine your feelings and actions symbolized in this dream.
References in periodicals archive ?
And her fa ilure here to read for the range of possibilities made available by the "patchwork" is precisely what marks Larsen's allusion to her novel's own revisionary relation to prior texts-a relation that would, in Larsen's last published work, be misunderstood by her contemporaries as much as it was by her protagonist in Quicksand.
Quicksand was written and published during a period of intense American cultural nationalism that, as George Hutchinson has recently argued, represents a crucial but often overlooked context for interpretations of African American modernism (Harlem).
Larsen's 1928 first novel, for instance, unmistakably echoed the title of Edith Wharton's short story "The Quicksand," and a contemporary reviewer of her 1929 novel Passing, remarking somewhat condescendingly that Larsen had "gone to Mrs.
While much of the most important scholarship on the novel has convincingly emphasized Larsen's unique contributions to the African American literary tradition, Quicksand proves nevertheless to be the product of a literary genealogy that is unmistakably biracial, a genealogy that not only represents the novel's textual he ritage but also constitutes its own subject and polemical target.
As Quicksand opens, Helga Crane sits beneath a "reading lamp" surrounded by "the bright covers of the books she had taken down from their long shelves.
Fittingly, then, Quicksand starts in a sense where Iola Leroy left off, and in a lands cape Larsen knew well from her own experiences at Fisk and Tuskegee: at "a large and flourishing school" in the South, where devoted servants of the race are found "casting [their] lot with the colored" and "lifting up the homes of the people" (280).
Larsen refigures this mise-en-abyme within Iola Leroy in a satiric scene in Quicksand, just after the narrator has reflected on the source of Helga's love of bright colors despite the Naxos preference for "black, brown, and grey":
Indeed, Dreiser's work, and particularly his most controversial novel, Sister Carrie, had by the time Larsen was writing Quicksand achieved unprecedented fame, catalyzed largely by the 1925 publication of An American Tragedy and its popular dramatic production on Broadway.