Quiet Tuning

quiet tuning

[′kwī·ət ′tün·iŋ]
(electronics)
Circuit arrangement for silencing the output of a radio receiver, except when it is accurately tuned to an incoming carrier wave.

Quiet Tuning

 

the resetting of a radio receiver from one station to another in such a way that atmospheric and industrial static, as well as internal static, on the loudspeaker is greatly reduced or eliminated. Quiet tuning is accomplished by means of an electrical device equipped with various circuits that block out (switch off) the audio frequency amplification stages or sharply reduce the band of low frequencies that can pass through, or circuits that switch on a relay that breaks the loudspeaker circuit, and so on. When the receiver is accurately tuned to the wave from a transmitting station, the quiet-tuning device is automatically disconnected. It is used in certain radio receivers.

References in periodicals archive ?
All Buick had to do to create a compact sedan to complement its mid-size Regal and its full-size LaCrosse was to run the Cruze through the Buick styling studio and subject it to a full round of Buick's so-called Quiet Tuning ministrations.
Quiet Tuning systems, processes and components are built into every facet of the vehicle's architecture to block or absorb sound and dampen or eliminate vibrations.
And so the engineers set to work to accomplish that, as the marketing folks came up with a term to describe what the engineers were providing: "Quiet Tuning." And the first sedan that is described as having it is the '05 LaCrosse, a midsize car that's meant to take on the likes of the Camry and the Accord but with the levels of refinement and attention to detail that one might expect from a Lexus or an Acura.