quire

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quire

[kwīr]
(materials)
Twenty-five sheets of paper, or one-twentieth of a 500-sheet ream.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Quiring hopes to add a Friday night show possibly in February of March
"I'm happy to see this area so receptive to the comedy club as a real comedy club and not just a bar," Quiring said.
Quiring has lived all his life in various Eastern Washington towns, but said he likes the Wenatchee area the best because of its beautiful surroundings and community appeal.
After a generous orientation to his theoretical scaffolding, Quiring turns his attention to Richard III and to analogs of the curse (e.g., excommunication, oath, prophecy) in the first chapter, which comprises nearly half of the book.
Interpreting King John as a "display of hollowness" in which concepts such as history and sovereignty are emptied of their significance (163), Quiring begins his brief second chapter.
Turning his attention to the broader implications of his study in the remaining pages, Quiring proposes, among other claims, that the curse is a major factor in the constitution of the modern subject.
Quiring speaks of the paradoxical nature of the curse.
What is particularly interesting is Quiring's connection of the curse to Schmitt's (1985) and Agamben's (2008) state of exception, but the curse can also be an instrument of power in the hands of authority.
With these new instructions in hand, Quiring, Wilms and Dyck moved quickly.
Many of these were harsh, demanding and caustic, and played a role in causing some village soviet chairmen to quit their jobs, as is evident from this directive that Quiring, Wilms and Dyck circulated to the Khortitsa village Soviets in February 1930: ...
Though Quiring interviewed about two dozen northern and government individuals, archive documents override these voices.
The global uranium market, new uses for timber previously viewed as low grade, fleeting hydro power and water export possibilities, greased with federal government funding until the mid 1970s, made the North economically attractive in a way it could not be during the time dealt with in Quiring's book.