Quirites


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Quirites

 

in ancient Rome of the republican era, an appellation for the citizens, commonly used in official addresses (Populus Romanus Quiritium). The term is considered to be a derivative of co-viri-um (curia, “assembly of the men”); hence, quirites were originally members of curiae, the total number of which, in the process of the formation of the Roman state, made up the Roman citizenship (with exclusive rights to quirite law and quirite property).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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(83) 'so that something might be conceded to the Sabines, the Quirites were named after the Cures'.
Populus Romanus Quirites, Torino, Giappichelli, 1974.
(22) <<La sapientia (teologica e giuridica) dei sacerdoti romani, mediante la definizione delle res divinae e delle res humanae, rivolgeva le sue prime e maggiori cautele ai rapporti tra uomini e divinita, al fine di evitare che una non perfetta conoscenza delle intrinseche qualita di uomini, cose materiali e Dei, potesse compromettere la conservazione della pax deorum, sulla cui stabilita riposava per la teologia e per il diritto la stessa vita del Populus Romanus Quirites. <<Nelle antitesi "divino/umano" e fas/nefas si manifestava "la pio antica concezione romana del mondo" (Orestano).
Deprived of its cross and the symbolic meaning that it had, Hadrian's obelisk eventually became a curiosity: 'an extraordinary monument', not erected in front of a church, a palace or a court of law to add dignity and authority to its surroundings as formerly, but 'to decorate the delightful glades of the Pincio', which, in accordance with the new democratic principles, were now 'opened for the public to bask in the sun', the public being the Romans, who in all previous obelisk inscriptions had always been addressed as Quirites or populus Romanus, but now for the first time appeared as cives ('citizens').
If he were a character, the audience would know the enigmatic "Q" in his name stands for Quirites, signifying his father s subtle hope that his son's future would make him rise above the rest.
At 39.15.13-14 the consul explicitly discusses these young men's fitness to serve in the military and represent the community of Romans: hoc sacramento initiatos iuvenes milites faciendos censetis, Quirites? his ex obsceno sacrario eductis arma committenda?