Don Quixote

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Don Quixote

 

(also Don Quijote), the hero of M. Cervantes’ novel El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quixote de la Mancha (2 vols., 1605-15).

While wandering about the ruined and oppressed Spain of the late 16th century, Don Quixote is always prepared to undertake knightly deeds in the name of love for humanity, even though life roughly crushes his illusions. The incongruity of the latter with historical reality leads to innumerable ironical and grotesque situations. Don Quixote embodies the tragedy of a humanist who becomes convinced that the ideals of justice and harmony in human relations cannot be realized. His tragicomic and humanistic meaning has universal human significance. Don Quixote, the “knight of the doleful countenance,” has been variously interpreted in works of world literature and art, and his name has come to be used to designate a man who is noble, bold, and magnanimous but remote from reality. Don Quixote has often been mentioned in the critical and journalistic essays of many Russian writers, including V. G. Belinskii, N. A. Dobroliubov, D. I. Pisarev, I. S. Turgenev, M. E. Saltykov-Shchedrin, F. M. Dostoevsky, and A. V. Lunacharskii.

REFERENCES

Turgenev, I. S. “Gamlet i Don-Kikhot.” In Polnoe sobranie sochinenii i pisem v 28 tomakh. Soch., vol. 8. Moscow-Leningrad, 1964. Pages 169-92.
Derzhavin, K. N. Servantes: Zhizn’ i tvorchestvo. Moscow, 1958. Snetkova, N. Don Kikhot Servantesa. Moscow-Leningrad, 1965. Servantes i vsemirnaia literatura: Sb. statei. Moscow, 1969. Predmore, R. L. The World of Don Quixote. Cambridge (Mass.), 1967.

M. A. GOL’DMAN

Quixote, Don

knight-errant ready to rescue distressed damsels. [Span. Lit.: Don Quixote]

Quixote, Don

spends his life redressing the wrongs of the whole world. [Sp. Lit.: Cervantes Don Quixote]

Quixote, Don

falls into a trance and has visions of Montesinos and other heroes. [Sp. Lit.: Cervantes Don Quixote]

Quixote, Don

ascribes all his misfortunes to the machinations of enchanters. [Span. Lit.: Cervantes Don Quixote]

Quixote, Don

completely taken in by all the tales and plans of his squire and others who humor his delusions. [Span. Lit.: Cervantes Don Quixote]

Quixote, Don

attacks windmills thinking them giants. [Span. Lit.: Don Quixote]
References in periodicals archive ?
3 The Distressed Countess Trifaldi, Afflicted by Her Beard, Implores Don Quixote to Avenge Her, probably 1716 Charles Coypel Oil on canvas, 123x130cm Palais Imperial de Compiegne; long-term loan from the Musee du Louvre, Paris Photo: @RMN-Grand Palais/ Art Resource, NY
The identification of Don Quixote as a classic involved the recognition of the tragicomic humanity of its principal characters, a tendency that fed in turn on the third process Rivero Iglesias identifies, involving changes in philosophical ideas regarding humor and artistic genius.
looking closely at how Don Quixote dialogues with the intellectual
We can observe, however, that even Ardila's careful differentiations direct us back into the infinite loop of Cervantes-Don Quixote, the signifier "quixotic" pointing to something formally and stylistically of Cervantes, and the signifiers "Cervantean," "Cervantic," and "Cervantine" always referencing the influences of that dominant text in Cervantes's oeuvre, Don Quixote (1605-15).
As the play-within-a-play unfolds, many who encounter the wildly eccentric Quixote are at first either amused or bemused by the funny old man.
Using the Spitzer Space Telescope operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology under contract with NASA, the team-led by Michael Mommert of Northern Arizona University-reexamined images of Don Quixote from 2009 when it was in the part of its orbit closest to the Sun, and found it had a coma and a faint tail.
The thesis that Don Quixote is structured on series of quaternities, on the levels of macrocosm and microcosm, is one of many well-argued, encompassing, and ingenious arguments that relate to the knight, to the text into which he is inscribed, and to authorial figures real and implied.
Por sua vez, na segunda secao parte-se de duas perspectivas: a filosofica e a literaria, enfatizando a imaginacao, para manchar o preto e branco da 'normalidade' com a importancia do esplendor cromatico multicolorido que Nietzsche e Quixote representam.
But in his mind, he is a knight named Don Quixote with a squire named Sancho and a muse named Dulcinea.
Don Quixote and Candide Seek Truth, Justice and El Dorado in the Digital Age
Based on an episode of the "Miguel de Cervantes" tale, the ballet follows the lofty adventures of Don Quixote, a crazy, old knight who strongly believes in chivalry, in Barcelona.
Don Quixote and Sancho Panza are not infrequently referred to as alazon and eiron.