Don Quixote

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Don Quixote

 

(also Don Quijote), the hero of M. Cervantes’ novel El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quixote de la Mancha (2 vols., 1605-15).

While wandering about the ruined and oppressed Spain of the late 16th century, Don Quixote is always prepared to undertake knightly deeds in the name of love for humanity, even though life roughly crushes his illusions. The incongruity of the latter with historical reality leads to innumerable ironical and grotesque situations. Don Quixote embodies the tragedy of a humanist who becomes convinced that the ideals of justice and harmony in human relations cannot be realized. His tragicomic and humanistic meaning has universal human significance. Don Quixote, the “knight of the doleful countenance,” has been variously interpreted in works of world literature and art, and his name has come to be used to designate a man who is noble, bold, and magnanimous but remote from reality. Don Quixote has often been mentioned in the critical and journalistic essays of many Russian writers, including V. G. Belinskii, N. A. Dobroliubov, D. I. Pisarev, I. S. Turgenev, M. E. Saltykov-Shchedrin, F. M. Dostoevsky, and A. V. Lunacharskii.

REFERENCES

Turgenev, I. S. “Gamlet i Don-Kikhot.” In Polnoe sobranie sochinenii i pisem v 28 tomakh. Soch., vol. 8. Moscow-Leningrad, 1964. Pages 169-92.
Derzhavin, K. N. Servantes: Zhizn’ i tvorchestvo. Moscow, 1958. Snetkova, N. Don Kikhot Servantesa. Moscow-Leningrad, 1965. Servantes i vsemirnaia literatura: Sb. statei. Moscow, 1969. Predmore, R. L. The World of Don Quixote. Cambridge (Mass.), 1967.

M. A. GOL’DMAN

Quixote, Don

knight-errant ready to rescue distressed damsels. [Span. Lit.: Don Quixote]

Quixote, Don

spends his life redressing the wrongs of the whole world. [Sp. Lit.: Cervantes Don Quixote]

Quixote, Don

falls into a trance and has visions of Montesinos and other heroes. [Sp. Lit.: Cervantes Don Quixote]

Quixote, Don

ascribes all his misfortunes to the machinations of enchanters. [Span. Lit.: Cervantes Don Quixote]

Quixote, Don

completely taken in by all the tales and plans of his squire and others who humor his delusions. [Span. Lit.: Cervantes Don Quixote]

Quixote, Don

attacks windmills thinking them giants. [Span. Lit.: Don Quixote]
References in periodicals archive ?
In due course, Sarshar would translate Don Quixote into Urdu as well.
A keen entrepreneur, Coypel entrusted the engraving of his Don Quixote paintings to some of the most distinguished French 18th-century printmakers.
In actuality, though, we learn that Quixote is a man named Alonso Quijana whose squabbling family is out to "cure'' him of his insanity for their own selfish reasons.
He also determined that Don Quixote did not have a coma or tail at this distance, which is common for comets because they need the Sun's radiation to form the coma and the Sun's charged particles to form the tail.
De Armas looks at the form of the last section of Part 1 of Don Quixote in terms of detective fiction, which has its origins in the distant past.
Quixote is also the managing partner of Smashbox Studios, Los Angeles' leading photo studio brand.
The fictive Don Quixote marries the woman of his dreams, and the final scene shows the happy couple dressed for their wedding.
The two concepts are not new to Bandera's thought, although the exhaustive application to the reading of the Quixote is (see Mimesis conflictiva y violencia en Cervantes y Calderon, Editorial Gredos, 1975; and The Sacred Game: The Role of the Sacred in the Genesis of Modern Literary Fiction, Pennsylvania State University Press, 1994.
It takes one very valid aspect of the complexity of the Quixote and turns it into the aspect.
A play within a musical, this revival finds West End actors Nicholas Pound and Steve Elias taking on the roles of the deluded knight Don Quixote and his faithful but slow sidekick Sancho Panza.
Without knockout leads -- as is the case in a touring revival in Thousand Oaks -- the consensus tilts more toward indifference -- never a good thing when you're dealing with Don Quixote.
In a characteristically refined, subtle fashion, Cruz's project troubled not just the fantasy of the perfect translation, but also the idea that, were one to peer into his mind, one might find there a more polished or nuanced version of Don Quixote than the one that fell so haltingly on listeners' ears in the gallery.