R. K. Narayan


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Narayan, R. K.

(Rasipuram Krishnaswami Narayan) (nərī`yän), 1906–2001, Indian novelist, b. Madras (now Chennai). Narayan, who wrote in English, published his first novel, Swami and Friends, in 1935. While he wrote hundreds of short stories for the Madras newspaper Hindu, he first came to international attention when his works were hailed in England by Graham GreeneGreene, Graham
(Henry Graham Greene), 1904–91, English novelist and playwright. Although most of his works combine elements of the detective story, the spy thriller, and the psychological drama, his novels are essentially parables of the damned.
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. His humorous novel The Financial Expert (1952) was the first of his works published in the United States. Frequently set in the fictional town of Malgudi, many of Narayan's 14 novels and numerous stories provide exquisitely crafted, witty, vital, and perceptive descriptions of everyday village life in S India. His fiction often deals with the protagonist's search for identity. Narayan's major works, usually centering around a modest hero and containing portraits of a variety of eccentrics, include The English Teacher, also known as Grateful to Life and Death (1945), The Printer of Malgudi (1949), The Guide (1958), The Man-Eater of Malgudi (1961), The Vendor of Sweets (1967), The Painter of Signs (1976), and A Tiger for Malgudi (1983). Among his short-story collections are Malgudi Days (1982) and The Grandmother's Tale and Selected Stories (1994).

Bibliography

See his My Days: A Memoir (1974) and Talkative Man (1987); biography by S. Ram and N. Ram (1996); studies by W. Walsh (1982), C. Vanden Driesen (1986), J. K. Biswal (1987), P. S. Sundaram (1988), G. Kain, ed. (1993), N. N. Sharan (1993), A. Hariprasanna (1994), A. L. McLeod, ed. (1994), M. Pousse (1995), M. Rahman (1998), P. K. Singh (1999), C. N. Srinath, ed. (2000), and K. Parija (2001).

References in periodicals archive ?
Sankar Sinha's essay, "Negotiating Tradition: The Complexity of R. K. Narayan's Postcolonial Position" then takes up the challenge and leads the reader into an investigation of Narayan's "preoccupation with hybridity" in The Guide (1958).
Bryan Hull's essay, "'Why do you pretend?': Performance, Myth, and Realism in R. K. Narayan's The Dark Room" sees the characters in the novel caught in a much more basic struggle between tradition and modernity and opting for a pre-colonial "simplicity and uniformity" (Hull 59).
The third of eight children, Rasipuram Krishnaswami Narayanaswami (he took the name R. K. Narayan at the suggestion of Graham Greene) was born in Madras, India, in 1906 to a middle-class, Tamil Brahmin family, the highest of the Hindu castes.
and India will serve to orient newcomers to R. K. Narayan (1906-2001).