RAID 10

(redirected from RAID 1+0)

RAID 10

(Redundant Array of Independent Disks Mode 10) A RAID subsystem that increases safety by writing the same data on two drives (mirroring), while increasing speed by interleaving data across two or more mirrored "virtual" drives (striping). RAID 10 provides the most security and speed but uses more drives than the more common RAID 5 method. See RAID 5, RAID 1, RAID 0 and RAID.


RAID 10 Architectures
With RAID 1+0, the drives are set up as mirrored pairs and then striped. In this configuration, a drive in each mirrored pair can fail. In RAID 0+1, they are striped first, and then mirrored. If a drive fails in one of the stripe sets, then the other stripe set must be used, and no drive can fail in that set.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For optimized protection--but at a higher cost than either tape or ATA disk--use RAID disk packs, writing the data using redundancy (such as RAID 1+0 or RAID 5).
RAID 1+0 (a compound RAID) is used when capacity exceeds a single drive.
RAID 5+1 is designed to overcome the limitations of RAID 1+0 and RAID 5 by combining the two.
Today's RAID storage solutions provide either limited protection (RAID 5), prohibitive expensive (RAID 5+1) or both (RAID 1+0).
Furthermore, there is no cost penalty for additional parity drives as required in a typical RAID 1+0 solution."
However, certain RAID levels are merely combinations of two other RAID levels such as RAID 1+0 (also called RAID 10) where multiple RAID 1 pairs are striped for faster access or RAID 15 where two RAID 5 arrays are mirrored for added reliability.