RAID 5

(redirected from RAID 6)

RAID 5

(Redundant Array of Independent Disks Mode 5) A popular disk or solid state drive (SSD) subsystem that increases safety by computing parity data and increasing speed by interleaving data across three or more drives (striping). RAID 5 is similar to RAID 3, except that RAID 5 parity is distributed among all drives, whereas RAID 3 uses separate parity drives.

RAID 6
Similar to RAID 5 but not as widely used, RAID 6 performs either two parity computations instead of one, or it performs the same parity computation on overlapping subsets of the data. Using four drives, RAID 6 can recover from two failed drives. See RAID parity, RAID 3, RAID 0 and RAID.


RAID 5 - Speed and Fault Tolerance
With data and parity striped across three or more drives, RAID 5 has been a popular method for obtaining speed and safety.
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References in periodicals archive ?
RAIDIX operates with the RAID 0, RAID 5, RAID 6, and RAID 10 levels.
RAID 7.3 is a sibling of RAID 6 with double parity, yet the former delivers greater reliability.
Winchester Systems, Inc, a data storage solutions company, has introduced its Enterprise RAID 6.
According to the company, Enterprise RAID 6 is a high performance, high reliability disk array featuring enterprise class, 1.2m hour MTBF (Mean Time Before Failure) SATA (E-SATA) disk drives and dual parity RAID 6 data protection.
Eight-port RAID controller for servers and NAS with dedicated IO processor, full open source Linux driver, RAID 6 capable*
** Read the Intel RAID 6 case study with Promise online at www.intel.com and www.promise.com
Even RAID 6 typically allows only two drives to fail before losing all data in the RAID set.
Recent developments in the storage industry have created a strong interest in RAID 6, or double-parity or multiple-parity capability.
While no formal standard specifications on RAID 6 have been published to date, a disk array configuration that can provide failure protection to more than one hard disk is called RAID 6.
The rise of RAID 6 is closely connected with the extensive popularization of disk array technologies since 2000.
The number of back-end I/Os per application write is always two for RAID 1; in OLTP applications it is generally four for RAID 5 and six for RAID 6.
* In a traditional RAID 1 (or 0+1, 5+1, RAID 6, etc.) storage configuration, with (say) data mirrored on two independent SCSI channels, all data could be lost in one channel and operation would continue.