RNA


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RNA:

see nucleic acidnucleic acid,
any of a group of organic substances found in the chromosomes of living cells and viruses that play a central role in the storage and replication of hereditary information and in the expression of this information through protein synthesis.
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RNA

(biochemistry)

RNA

Biochem ribonucleic acid; any of a group of nucleic acids, present in all living cells, that play an essential role in the synthesis of proteins. On hydrolysis they yield the pentose sugar ribose, the purine bases adenine and guanine, the pyrimidine bases cytosine and uracil, and phosphoric acid
References in periodicals archive ?
These compartments ensure that all the components for the chemical reactions of life are in easy reach, but in the prebiotic world the building blocks for RNA -- or the RNA enzymes needed to drive the chemical reactions that could lead to life -- would probably have been scarce, floating around in the primordial soup.
Then, they took RNA from brain cells of the trained snails and bathed them in untrained cells.
RNA was precipitated by centrifugation at 15,000 g for 5 min and washed with 70% ethanol as described in method I.
Arrakis Therapeutics has developed a proprietary platform to identify new RNA targets and drug candidates.
If we stay within the infectious diseases (ID) context for the moment, there can also be benefits to choosing RNA as our target material even in living, DNA-based organisms.
Although RNA is easily and successfully isolated from most cells and tissues, intact RNA extraction from the pancreas is difficult due to the high level of its ribonucleases (RNases).
It's not enough to have the necessary molecules that make up RNA floating around; they need to be compartmentalized and they need to stay together without diffusing away," Bevilacqua said.
We developed a method to isolate good quality RNA from leaves of C.
"Agilent SureSelect RNA Capture improves the efficiency of RNA-seq for cancer research and is an essential tool for finding novel fusion genes from our tumor cDNA libraries," said Hiroyuki Mano, M.D., Ph.D, professor at Jichi Medical University and the University of Tokyo.
But a study of RNA in white blood cells from 27 different people shows that, on average, each person has nearly 4,000 genes in which the RNA copies contain misspellings not found in DNA.