RNA polymerase II


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RNA polymerase II

[¦är¦en¦ā pə¦lim·ə‚rās ′tü]
(cell and molecular biology)
An enzyme that transcribes messenger ribonucleic acid sequences in the chromatin.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is an inhibitor of RNA polymerase II. This enzyme is essential for the transcription process that is over-activated in tumors with transcription addiction.
Creative Biolabs provides transcription toxins such as amatoxins (targeting RNA polymerase II) and thailanstatin A (targeting spliceosome) as ADC payloads.
RNA polymerase II (RNAPII), the enzyme that produces RNA from a DNA template, can become stuck due to damage to the DNA template, and these jams must be cleared to restore gene expression and normal cell function.
Promoter-specific mRNA synthesis requires a minimal set of proteins comprising Pol II (RNA polymerase II) and associated GTFs (general transcription factors), which is defined as in vitro "basal transcription" [1].
FUS/TLS directly associates with RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) at the promoter region [91, 92] and is critical for the directionality of transcription [93, 94].
The core promoter element, the TATA-box (Juven-Gershon and Kadonaga, 2010) which binds RNA polymerase II is predicted to be located at the upstream of the transcription start site #1 (TSS1) with the sequence GATAAA.
Among these 9 pathway interactions, the pathway of RNA polymerase II transcription (ID = 503) interacted with four pathways including nucleotide excision repair (ID = 379), RNA polymerase I (ID = 499), mRNA splicing (ID = 340), and mRNA splicing-major pathway (ID = 341).
Some ciRNAs are predominantly localized in the nucleus and can promote host-gene transcription through interacting with the RNA polymerase II (pol II) in the promoter region of genes (Figure 3(a)) [18, 38].
The m7G caps were added to the products of RNA polymerase II shortly after transcriptional initiation within a narrow window of nascent oligonucleotides (+20 to +40), indicating that the process is rapid and efficient.
Background: Molecular events that cause tumor formation upregulate a number of HOX genes, called switch genes, coding for RNA polymerase II transcription factors.
Some chapter topics include origins of specificity in protein-DNA recognition, transcript elongation by RNA polymerase II, and adding new chemistries to the genetic code.
The Tat/TAR interaction recruits numerous cellular transcriptional coactivators to TAR, including P-TEFb (Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b), an RNA polymerase II C-terminal kinase, resulting in the phosphorylation of the C-Terminal Domain (CTD) of RNA Polymerase II (6).