race relations

(redirected from Racial antagonism)
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race relations

  1. the social relations between ethnic or racial groups.
  2. the academic study of these social relations.
In sociology, ‘race relations’ has focused upon the effects of DISCRIMINATION and RACISM on groups which have been singled out for such treatment, and also on the political struggle against racism. However, the use of the term ‘race relations’ is controversial on two main grounds. First, some sociologists argue that the term lends credence to the biological conception of race, which has no clear scientific foundation. Secondly, it can be argued that ‘race relations’ is not a distinctive area of social relations but can only be understood within the wider context of political and ideological processes and social relations in general.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, by relating the existent racial antagonism between whites and blacks, which bear the scars of slavery, to the cultural divisions between Hispanics and Anglos, presumably because of the linguistic advantage to Latinos, Huntington is once again creating a facile analogy complete with sociohistorical distortions for the purpose of prophesizing "American" cultural doom.
First of all, American thought leaders have to take an active position, with both right and left reducing the incendiary rhetoric that unites racial antagonisms with guns.
Known for its Quaker roots and liberal democratic ideals, Philadelphia was not without the racial antagonism that plagued other American cities.
What happened was that there was a racial antagonism between Mexican cool cats who were living in L.
However, there is no racial antagonism in these positions.
The saddest thing about Officer Ron Jones' death is that Jones seems to have been an exception to all of this racial antagonism.
Employers do not normally "foment racial antagonism to keep the proletariat divided and weak.
But if the recent riots in France have shown anything, it is how quickly racial antagonism can escalate and the damage it can cause.
Pressing public necessity may sometimes justify the existence of such restrictions; racial antagonism never can.
But if the races are different, then however much we might like to "celebrate difference," we are apt in fact to have racial antagonism.
Recognizing the tragedy of Irish/African American relations in the nineteenth century need not stir up racial antagonism today, as the Hibernians suggest, but instead shows both groups their common history, and provides a basis for future understanding.