RadioAstron

RadioAstron

(ray-dee-oh-ass -tron, rad-ee-) An international collaborative mission to launch a 10-meter diameter radio telescope into an elliptical orbit (apogee 80 000 km, period 28 hours) around the Earth. The dish is made from 27 carbon-fiber petals with a surface accuracy of 0.5 mm. RadioAstron is designed to carry out VLBI observations in conjunction with ground-based telescopes, operating at wavelengths of 1.35, 6, 18 and 92 cm with an angular resolution of up to 30 milliarcseconds.

Initiated in the former Soviet Union, the project now has support from more than 20 countries and is planned for launch around 2003.

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El instrumento, conocido tambien como RadioAstron, esta equipado con un espejo central y 27 petalos, cuenta con una antena de recepcion parabolica, convertidores y equipos transmisores.
Sample topics include: new orbit and new possibilities of the Radioastron Project, VLBI observations of sources of maser radiation by a ground-space interferometer, the use of lens antennae in radio astronomy, multichannel spectrum analyzer for observation of pulsars, and synthesis of VLBI images using the regularization methods.
The Soviet Union plans to launch a satellite called RADIOASTRON for VLBI in 1992, and the report proposes German participation in the network that goes with it.
Observations are obtained regularly in conjunction with RadioAstron, a 10-meter radio telescope the Russian space agency launched into orbit in 2011, for example.
As a follow up to your article "Einstein's Shadow" (S&T: February 2012, page 18), I have the following question: the Russian radio telescope RadioAstron was recently launched into space and has started operations.
Even higher resolution is eventually expected from Russia's Radioastron satellite, which is designed to go into a highly elliptical orbit that will yield baselines as large as 77,000 km.