radiometric dating


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Related to radiometric dating: Carbon 14 dating

radiometric dating

(ray-dee-oh-met -rik) The dating of rocks (and also fossils and archeological remains) by the accurate determination of the quantities of a long-lived radioactive isotope and its stable decay product in a sample. Assuming that the parent radioisotope was present at the time of formation of the rock, etc., then the number of daughter isotopes produced by radioactive decay of the parent depends only on the half-life of the parent and the age of the sample. Half-lives must therefore be known with great accuracy for precise dating and should range from about 105 to about 1010 years. In addition, there should be no loss or gain of parent or daughter isotope during the time the ‘radioactive clock’ is operating; if this condition is only partly satisfied, allowances must be made. The decay of radioisotopes can be used not only to date material but also to time very slow processes, such as the evolution of the Earth's atmosphere.

Pairs of isotopes used in radiometric dating include potassium–40 which decays to argon–40 with a half-life of 1.25 × 109 years, and rubidium–87 which decays to strontium–87 with a half-life of 4.88 × 1010 years.

radiometric dating

[‚rād·ē·ə‚me·trik ′dād·iŋ]
(archeology)
A dating method that utilizes the radioactive decay of certain long-lived, naturally occurring parent isotopes to stable daughter isotopes.
(nucleonics)
A technique for measuring the age of an object or sample of material by determining the ratio of the concentration of a radioisotope to that of a stable isotope in it; for example, the ratio of carbon-14 to carbon-12 reveals the approximate age of bones, pieces of wood, and other archeological specimens. Also known as isotopic age determination; nuclear age determination; radioactive age determination; radioactive dating; radiogenic age determination; radiogenic dating.
References in periodicals archive ?
Student: "They would use superposition as well as the radiometric dating. Super means over and position means places so they would look at a rock and see how big it is.
"Jurassic", "Maastrichtian" "Harpoceras falciferum ammonite zone" or "polarity Chron C24r"); 2) the (chronometric) measurement of linear time (through, for example, radiometric dating) or elapsed durations (e.g.
While few serious scientists have questioned radiometric dating for more than 50 years, let's accept that the assumptions about atomic theory that underlie it are false.
Recent radiometric dating (Miller and Fyffe 2002; Van Wagoner and Dadd 2003) also support a Silurian age for the Eastport Formation.
When the Kansas State geologist bogged down in a trench fight with Mark the creationist over radiometric dating, Miller bounded to the front of the room.
The section on radiometric dating of rock-pictures contains four articles: two on the AMS radiocarbon technique (Tuniz; Lawson and Hotchkiss) and others on the extraction of small carbon samples from charcoal pictographs using plasma-chemistry (Armitage and others) or from rock-surface accretions using micro-excavation and laser-induced decomposition techniques (Watchman).
So, when I enter "dating" and click on the science check-box I am not flooded with match-making Web pages, but instead I am advised about Web pages that deal with the dating of objects, like the Shroud of Turin, without the need to specify carbon dating, luminescence dating, or radiometric dating. From another perspective of dating, limiting my search to a date range is a nice feature in Northern Light, as it lets me define both "from" and "to" time frames.
The determination and reliability of the ages of (mostly) igneous rocks are due to the various methods of radiometric dating.
The system is dedicated to this special application and will considerably improve radiometric dating and trace element analysis in pure and applied science in an interdisciplinary perspective.
For example, techniques such as radiometric dating are based on assumptions that are not generally publicized.
and Pecskay, Z.: 2002, Radiometric dating of the Tertiary volcanics in Lower Silesia, Poland.
The paint-analysis technique may provide an inexpensive alternative to other methods of determining the age of archaeological sites, such as radiometric dating of artifacts.