rainbird

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rainbird

any of various birds, such as (in Britain) the green woodpecker, whose cry is supposed to portend rain
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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The Old Low Light was chosen as the perfect setting for the exhibition, as Rainbird sketched and painted the Fish Quay and the nearby streets throughout his short life.
Victor Noble Rainbird was born in North Shields in 1887.
Later in the same year, Rainbird was in France with the 21st battalion of the Northumberland Fusiliers and experienced Ypres, Passchendale, Vimy Ridge and Armentieres.
Rainbird's favourite subjects were the North Sea, the Fish Quay, and the streets and people of the town.
David Young, a retired senior procurement manager for a building firm who has built up a collection of 30 of the artist's paintings, said: "Victor Noble Rainbird was a prolific and gifted artist.
For details see www.victornoblerainbird.com David Hirst has tracked down Rainbird paintings for sale or for auction in other parts of the country and has brought them back to North Shields.
105), but The Rainbirds advocates the spiritual austerity of life without comfort.
It may be then, that criticism of society in The Rainbirds which appears to be directed against the conforming masses should also be taken to include the conforming literati who accept the coherence of a provincial perspective.
There are other Dunedins, different from the one both confirmed and undermined by The Rainbirds. In An Angel At My Table Frame writes about the Dunedin suburbs of Caversham and Kensington where 'I had seen the poverty, the rows of decaying houses washed biscuit-colour by time and the rain and the floods; and the pale children lank-haired, damp looking, as if they emerged each day from the tide'.
In the Dunedin of The Rainbirds, material prosperity is general.
While she was writing The Rainbirds her Burns Fellowship gave her the salary of a university junior lecturer, a room and freedom to write.
There are several Dunedins, and it is worth asking why the provincial view of it should have been the one so readily accepted; why the coherent provincial perspective of Dunedin in The Rainbirds is so much more visible than its subversions.